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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [M4v f79v]

EMBLEMA CXXII.

In eum qui truculentia suorum perierit.

On one who perished through the savagery of his own people.

PROSOPOPEIA

Things given speech.

Delphinem invitum me in littora compulit aestus,
Exemplum infido quanta pericla mari.
Nam si nec propriis Neptunus parcit alumnis,
Quis tutos homines navibus esse putet.[1]

I am a dolphin whom the tide drove ashore against my will, an example showing what great dangers there are in the treacherous sea. For if Neptune does not spare even his own nurslings, who can think that men are safe in ships?

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [M5r f80r]

Das CXXII.

Wider den so auß unbarmhertzigkeit
der seinen verdirbt.

Mich Delphin hat mit gwalt an rand
Die Meeres Wellen gstossen zLand
Bin also ein Exempel und Bild
Der grossen gfar deß Meeres wild
Dann so Neptun selbs nit verschont
Sein eigen Diener drinn bewont
Wer wolt dann glauben das die Leut
In Schiffen darvor weren gfreyt.

Notes:

1.  This is based on Anthologia graeca 7.216 (two lines omitted).


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Section: VINDICTA (Retribution). View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [M5r p185]

Iusta vindicta.

Just recompense

Dum residet Cyclops sinuosi in faucibus antri,
Haec secum teneras concinit inter oves.
Pascite vos herbas: sociis ego pascar Achivis,
Postremumque Utin viscera nostra ferent.
Audiit haec Itachus, Cyclopaque lumine cassum
Reddidit. En poenas ut suus author habet[1]?[2]

Sitting in the mouth of his arching cave, the Cyclops sang thus to himself amidst his gentle sheep: Do you feed on grass; I shall feed on the Greek companions, and last of all my belly shall get No-man. The man from Ithaca heard this and made the Cyclops eyeless. See how the one who plotted misfortune collects it himself!

Notes:

1.  A proverbial sentiment: cf. Erasmus, Adagia 3091, Di tibi dent tuam mentem.

2.  For the story of Ulysses (the man from Ithaca) in the Cyclops’ cave and his escape by blinding the Cyclops, see Homer, Odyssey 9.177 ff. Ulysses had told the Cyclops his name was No-man. (Utis l. 4).


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