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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [B7v p30]

Nec quaestioni quidem cedendum.

Do not yield even to torture.

EMBLEMA XIII.

Cecropia effictam quam cernis in arce Leaenam,
Harmodii (an nescis hospes?) amica fuit.
Sic animum placuit monstrare viraginis acrem
More ferae, nomen vel quia tale tulit.
Quòd fidibus contorta, suo non prodidit ullum
Indicio, elinguem reddidit Iphicrates.[1]

This lioness that you see represented on the Athenian citadel was Harmodius’ lover - stranger, you must know the story. This was how they decided to proclaim the brave woman’s fierce spirit, by representing her as a lioness. Besides, her name was Lioness too. Tortured on the rack, she betrayed no-one by her evidence, and so Iphicrates represented the beast without a tongue.

Notes:

1.  Harmodius and Aristogeiton conspired to kill Hipparchus, the brother of the Athenian tyrant Hippias. Harmodius was killed, Aristogeiton arrested and tortured. Also tortured was Leaena (‘Lioness’) a courtesan, beloved of Harmodius, as she too was suspected of being in the conspiracy. She however revealed nothing. After the fall of Hippias, the two men were treated as tyrannicides and bronze statues were erected in their honour (509 BC). To avoid appearing to honour a courtesan, the Athenians had Leaena represented by Iphicrates (or Amphicrates) as a lioness without a tongue, indicating both her name and the reason for remembering her. See Pliny, Natural History 34.19.72; Plutarch, De garrulitate 505E.


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  • tongue [31A22141] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • torture [44G330] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Taciturnity; 'Secretezza', 'Secretezza overo Taciturnità' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [52DD3(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Courage, Bravery, Valiance, Manliness; 'Ardire magnanimo et generoso', 'Gagliardezza', 'Valore', 'Virtù heroica', 'Virtù dell'animo e del corpo' (Ripa) [54A8] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Honour, Glory; 'Ampiezza della Gloria', 'Gloria', 'Gloria de prencipi', 'Gloria & Honore', 'Honore', 'Sublimatà della Gloria' (Ripa) [59B31] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • names of cities and villages (with NAME) [61E(ATHENS)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • (story of) Harmodius and Aristogiton representations to which the NAME of a person from classical history may be attached [98B(HARMODIUS & ARISTOGITON)3] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • male persons from classical history (with NAME) representations to which the NAME of a person from classical history may be attached [98B(IPHICRATES)3] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • female persons from classical history (with NAME) suffering, misfortune of person from classical history [98C(LAENA)6] Search | Browse Iconclass

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Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [b1r p17]

Potentissimus affectus amor.

Love, the all-powerful emotion

VII.

Aspice ut invictus vires auriga leonis,
Expressus gemma pusio vincat amor:
Utque manu hac scuticam teneat, hac flectat habenas,
Utque sit in pueri plurimus ore decor.[1]
Dira lues procul esto, feram qui vincere talem,
Est potis, à nobis temperet an ne manus? [2]

Look - here’s Love the lad, carved on a gem. See how he rides triumphant in his chariot and subdues the lion’s might. How in one hand he holds a lash, with the other he guides the reins, and on his countenance rests the loveliness of youth. - Dread pestilence keep far away. Would one who has the power to conquer such a beast keep his hands from us?

COMMENTARIA.

Videre est, mirum quàm fit fortissimus auri-
ga parvulus puer Cupido (Amoris Deus, fi-
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [b1v p18]lius Veneris qui à variis variè describitur)
adeoque ut etiam vires ferocissimi Leonis su-
peret audaculus. dextra flagellum tenet, sini-
straque loros & habenas dirigit, faciemque interim
monstrat blandam & amabilem. Sed absit lon-
gè & pereat huiusmodi lues: si enim bestiam
usque adeò feram, domare & vincere potest,
quanto facilius nos imbecillos homines su-
peraret? Res immoderata Cupido est, inquit
Ovidius lib. 4. de Ponto. Sed videndus est de
hac re omnino Crinitius lib. 16. ca. 4. de honesta
disciplina Quem obsecro non vincit Amor, vel
etiam sanctissimos viros? Quis Davide san-
ctior? quis Salomone sapientior? quis Sampso-
ne
fortior? Amore tamen superati omnes.

Notes:

1.  In some editions, this sequence of subjunctives is changed to indicative.

2.  This is a translation of Anthologia graeca 9.221, an epigram about a seal carved with a representation of Eros driving a chariot drawn by lions.


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  • Strength, Power; 'Fortezza', 'Fortezza d'Animo e di corpo', 'Fortezza del corpo congiunta con la generosit?ell'animo', 'Fortezza & valore del corpo congiunto con la prudenza & virt? animo', 'Forza' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [54A7(+4):56F2(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • 'Forza d'amore, Forza d'amore si nell'acqua come in terra' (Ripa) [56F2515] Search | Browse Iconclass

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