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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [C2v p36]

Prudens magis quam loquax.

Wise head, close mouth.

EMBLEMA XIX.

Noctua Cecropiis[1] insignia praestat Athenis,
Inter aves sani noctua consilii.
Armiferae meritò obsequiis sacrata Minervae,
Garrula quo cornix cesserat antè loco.[2]

The owl provides the symbol for Athens, Cecrops’ city, for among the birds the owl is known for wise counsel. Deservedly was it dedicated to the service of weapon-bearing Minerva, in the place vacated by the chattering crow.

Notes:

1.  Cecrops was a legendary wise early king of Athens, a city renowned as a place of learning. See above, Emblem 5 ([A91a005]), line 7.

2.  garrula quo cornix cesserat, ‘vacated by the chattering crow’. The crow was dismissed from Athena’s service for telling tales, and was replaced by the owl. See Ovid, Metamorphoses, 2.562-5. This story is represented in Aneau, ‘Periculum in terra, periculum in mari’ ([FANa029]).


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [b3v p22]

Reverentiam in matrimonio
requiri.

Respect is required in marriage

X.

Cùm furit in Venerem pelagi se in littore sistit
Vipera, & ab stomacho dira venena vomit:
Muraenamque ciens, ingentia sibila tollit,
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [b4r p23]At subitò amplexus appetit illa viri.[1]
Maxima debetur thalamo reverentia, coniunx
Alternum debet coniugi & obsequium.

When the viper is sexually aroused, it stations itself on the seashore and ejects the dread poisons from its gut. To summon the moray eel, it raises a loud hissing, and suddenly she comes to the embrace of her mate. - Great reverence is owed to the marriage bed, and the partners owe each other mutual respect.

COMMENTARIA.

Vipera nequissimum genus serpentis & astu-
tissimum, libidine coëundi exaestuans, ad lit-
tus progreditur, ibique sibilando praesentiam
suam testatur, & sponsam suam Muraenam
allicit, ac omne venenum evomitione eiicit,
ut suavis sponsus suae sponsae videatur. Murae-
na verò protinus è Mari egreditur, atque am-
bo mutuam libidinem expleunt, mox haec ad
mare regreditur: illa verò resorpto iterum
veneno, ad latibulum suum etiam revertitur.
Autores sunt Aelianus lib. 12. cap. 5. & cap. 23.
Plinius lib. 9. cap. 23. & Caelius antiquarum lectio-
num lib. 16. cap. 13. Muraena piscis marinus
est, à nonnullis Lampetra putatur, sed falsò. de
qua Plinius loco citato. Sic etiam inter hu-
mana consortia, matrimonialis re-
verentia plurimum adverten
da & observanda erit, ut
vir uxorque sponte
alterna exer-
ceant obse
quia.

Notes:

1.  For the mating of the viper with the moray eel, see Pliny, Natural History 9.39.76; Aelian, De natura animalium 1.50; 9.66. The viper spits out the poison in order to be gentle and safe for the union.


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