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Ex bello pax.

Peace succeeding to war

EMBLEMA CLXXVIII.

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En galea, intrepidus quam miles gesserat, & quae
Saepius hostili sparsa cruore fuit:
Parta pace apibus tenuis concessit in usum
Alveoli, atque favos, grataque mella gerit.
Arma procul iaceant: fas sit tunc sumere bellum
Quando aliter pacis non potes arte frui.[1]

See here a helmet which a fearless soldier previously wore and which was often spattered with enemy blood. After peace was won, it retired to be used as a narrow hive for bees; it holds honey-combs and nice honey. - Let weapons lie far off; let it be right to embark on war only when you cannot in any other way enjoy the art of peace.

Notes:

1. Cf. Anthologia graeca, 6.236, where bees nest in what were once the beaks (projections at the prow) of war-galleys.


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Auxilium nunquam deficiens.

Help never failing

XLIII.

Bina pericla unis effugi sedulus armis,
Cm premererque solo, cm premererque salo.
Incolumen ex acie clypeus me praestitit, idem
Naufragum apprensus littora adusque tulit.[1]

Double danger have I escaped by careful use of one set of arms, when I was hard-pressed on dry land and when I was in dire straits amidst the swelling billows. My shield brought me safe from the battle. The same shield, when I seized it, carried me, ship-wrecked, right to the shore.

COMMENTARIA.

Fingit Autor militem quendam unicis suis
armis in diversis periculis sese egregi salvas-
se, cm enim is in terra militaret, scuto seu cly
peo suo ab inimicorum ictibus protegendo
se defendit, mox cm in Mari naufragium pas-
sus, super eodem natando ad litus usque por-
tatus denu incolumis evasit. Sic viris corda-
tis & magnanimis, fortuna, etiam in rebus
quantumcunque afflictis atque adversis, facil mo-
dum auxiliumve ministrat, ut denique vulg
fertur, fortes fortuna adiuvat.

Notes:

1. This is based on Anthologia graeca 9, 42. See also 9, 109.


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