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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [m7v p190]

In pudoris statuam.

A statue of Modesty

III.

Penelope desponsa sequi cupiebat Ulyssem,
Ni secum Icarius mallet habere pater.[1]
Ille Ithacam, hic offert Spartem manet anxia virgo,
Hinc pater, inde viri mutuus urget amor.
Ergo sedens velat vultus, obnubit ocellos:
Ista verecundi signa pudoris erant.
Queis sibi praelatum Icarius cognovit Ulyssem,
Hocque pudori aram schemate constituit.[2]

When Penelope was betrothed, she wished to go with Ulysses, except that her father Icarius would have preferred to keep her with him. Ulysses offers Ithaca, her father Sparta. The girl is distressed: on opposite sides her father and the mutual love between her and her man make their claims on her. So she sits and covers her face, veils her eyes - those were the signs of seemly modesty. By them Icarius knew that Ulysses was preferred to himself, and he set up an altar to Modesty in this form.

Notes:

1.  Some editions give a variant reading, Ni secus Icarius ..., ‘except that ... Icarius would have preferred to have it otherwise’.

2.  See Pausanias, Periegesis, 3.20.10, for this statue and the story behind it.


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    Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [m7r p189]

    Andreae Alciati Em-
    blematum liber
    secundus.

    In divites publico malo.

    Those who grow rich out of public misfortune

    I.

    Anguillas quisquis captat, si limpida verrat
    Flumina, si illimes ausit adire lacus,
    Cassus erit, ludetque operam. multum excitet ergo
    Si cretae, & vitreas palmula turbet aquas,
    Dives erit. sic iis res publica turbida lucro est,
    Qui pace, arctati legibus, esuriunt.[1]

    If anyone hunting eels sweeps clear rivers or thinks to visit unmuddied lakes, he will be unsuccessful and waste his efforts. If he instead stirs up much clay and with his oar churns the crystal waters, he will be rich. Likewise a state in turmoil becomes a source of profit to people who in peace go hungry, because the law cramps their style.

    Notes:

    1.  Cf. Erasmus, Adagia, 2579 (Anguillas captare).


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