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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [m7v p190]

Ficta Religio.

False religion.

V.

Regali residens meretrix pulcherrima sella,[1]
Purpureo insignem gestat honore peplum,
Omnibus & latices pleno č cratere propinat,
At circum cubitans ebria turba iacet.
Sic Babylona notant, quae gentes illice forma,
Et ficta stolidas relligione capit.

A beauteous harlot reclining on a royal seat wears a robe resplendent with purple, the badge of honour. From a full bowl she passes round the cup of drink to all, and round about the drunken crowd sprawls in stupor. Thus they indicate Babylon, who with her alluring beauty takes in the doltish nations with false religion.

Notes:

1.  See Revelation 17:3 ff., which has influenced the illustration.


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    In pudoris statuam.

    A statue of Modesty

    III.

    Penelope desponsa sequi cupiebat Ulyssem,
    Ni secum Icarius mallet habere pater.[1]
    Ille Ithacam, hic offert Spartem manet anxia virgo,
    Hinc pater, inde viri mutuus urget amor.
    Ergo sedens velat vultus, obnubit ocellos:
    Ista verecundi signa pudoris erant.
    Queis sibi praelatum Icarius cognovit Ulyssem,
    Hocque pudori aram schemate constituit.[2]

    When Penelope was betrothed, she wished to go with Ulysses, except that her father Icarius would have preferred to keep her with him. Ulysses offers Ithaca, her father Sparta. The girl is distressed: on opposite sides her father and the mutual love between her and her man make their claims on her. So she sits and covers her face, veils her eyes - those were the signs of seemly modesty. By them Icarius knew that Ulysses was preferred to himself, and he set up an altar to Modesty in this form.

    Notes:

    1.  Some editions give a variant reading, Ni secus Icarius ..., ‘except that ... Icarius would have preferred to have it otherwise’.

    2.  See Pausanias, Periegesis, 3.20.10, for this statue and the story behind it.


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