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Furor, & rabies.

Fury and madness

XLIX.

Ora gerit clypeus rabiosi picta leonis,
Et scriptum in summo margine carmen habet:
Hic hominum est terror, cuius possessor Atrida.
Talia magnanimus signa Agamemno tulit.[1]

The shield bears the painted face of a raging lion, and inscribed upon the upper margin has a verse: ‘This is the terror of men, and the son of Atreus is its possessor’. Haughty Agamemnon bore this symbolic figure.

Notes:

1.  This poem is based on Pausanias, Periegesis, 5.19.4. For the ‘raging lion’. Cf. Emblem 270,‘Ira’ ([A56a270]). For Agamemnon’s savage temper, see e.g. Homer, Iliad, 1.103-4.


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    Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [n5v p202]

    Amygdalus.

    The almond

    XLIII.

    Cur properans foliis praemittis amygdale flores?
    Odi pupillos praecocis ingenii.[1]

    Almond tree, why are you in such a hurry to put out flowers before your leaves? I hate precocious pupils.

    Notes:

    1.  See Quintilian (Fabius Quintilianus), Institutio oratoria, 1.3.3: “the precocious type of intellect never easily comes to fruition”.


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