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Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[G2v p100]

Les inviolables du traict
de Cupido.

APOSTROPHE.

Affin qu’amour ne te vincque, & te trompe,
Et ton esprit nulle femme corrompe
L’oyseau Bacchus mettras (si tu me crois)
Droict en ung rond, tellement qu’une croix[1]
Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[G3r p101]Du becque, de l’aele, & de la queŁe applicque:
Tel remede est contre tout art magicque.
Jason ne peut (en portant telles armes)
Estre vincu par Medťe, & ses charmes.[2]

L’oyseau Bacchus est Bacul, ou Balle-
queŁe, signifiant mouvement luxurieux,
lequel ainsi estendu en croix en une
sphaere: donne ŗ entendre qu’il fault: (com-
me dict Sainct Paul:) cruxifier ses concu-
piscences en ce monde.

Notes:

1.These lines describe the rhombos, a device used in casting love-spells. The bird usually employed was a wryneck, associated with Bacchus, possibly because of its dappled markings. (Cf. the dappled fawns associated with the god.) The wagtail seems to have been confused with the wryneck in folk belief.

2.Jason was helped in the tasks imposed on him by the king of Phasis, by the sorceress Medea, daughter of the king. Instructed by Venus, Jason used the rhombos to cause Medea to fall in love with him and so use her spells to help, not harm, him. See Pindar, Pythian Odes 4.216ff.


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  • Protection; 'Custodia', 'Difesa contra nimici, malefici & venefici', 'Difesa contra pericoli', 'Riparo da i tradimenti' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [54E42(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • (personifications and symbolic representations of) Love; 'Amore (secondo Seneca)' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [56F2(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • attributes of Cupid (with NAME) [92D18(DART)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • (story of) Jason [95A(JASON)] Search | Browse Iconclass

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Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[n6r p203]

Nupta contagioso.

A woman married to a diseased man

L.

Dii meliora piis,[1] Mezenti. cur agŤ sic me
Compellas?[2] emptus quÚd tibi dote gener,
Gallica quem scabies,[3] dira & mentagra perurit.
Hoc est quidnam aliud, dic mihi saeve pater,
Corpora corporibus quŗm iungere mortua vivis,
Efferaque Etrusci facta novare ducis?[4]

O Mezentius, God grant a better fate to the dutiful! - Now why do you address me by that name? - Because with a dowry you have purchased a son-in-law seared by the Gallic scab and the dreaded sore on the face. What else is this - o tell me, cruel father - but to join corpses to living bodies and repeat the savage deeds of the Etruscan leader?

Notes:

1.Vergil, Georgics, 3.513.

2.sic me compellas, ‘address me by that name’, i.e. Mezentius. This is explained below, note 4.

3.Gallica...scabies, ‘the Gallic scab’: Osseous lesions caused by syphilis, which was epidemic in Europe following Charles VIII’s first Italian war. Spreading to the French army following its occupation of Naples (February 1495), it became known to the French as “the Neapolitan sickness”, to the Italians as “the French sickness.” It acquired its modern name from a mythological Latin poem on the subject by Girolamo Fracastoro, “Syphilis sive morbus gallicus”, a popular favourite first published in 1530. Fracastoro later used the name Syphilus (a mythical shepherd) when he contributed to the scientific literature on the disease (Liber I de sympathia et antipathia rerum, de contagione et contagiosis morbis, 1550). Note that here the French uses ‘un villain Podagre’ instead, which Cotgrave lists as the gout. Of the two corresponding emblems with this one, the 1549 edition uses verolle (pox), and 1615 uses podagre in the title and verolle in the verse.

4.See Vergil, Aeneid, 8.483-88, for the crimes of Mezentius, the Etruscan king who opposed Aeneas on his arrival in Italy. He inflicted a dreadful fate on his victims by tying them face to face with a corpse and leaving them to die.


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