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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Q5v f112v]

EMBLEMA CLXXVIII [=177] .

Maledicentia.

Evil speaking

Archilochi[1] tumulo insculptas de marmore vespas
Esse ferunt,[2] linguae certa sigilla malae.

They say that on the tomb of Archilochus wasps were carved in marble, sure figures of an evil tongue.

Das CLXXVIII [=177] .

Ubelreden.

Es solln auffs Archilochs Grabstein
Wie man sagt Wespen ghauwen seyn
Sie seind ein gwiß zeichn und urkundt
Eins bösen Mauls und herben Mundt.

Notes:

1.  Archilochus was an eighth-century BC poet, author of much (now fragmentary) verse, including satire. This last was considered in antiquity to be excessively abusive and violent. See Horace, Ars Poetica, 79; also Erasmus, Adagia, 60 (Irritare crabrones).

2.  ferunt, ‘they say’: words suggested by Anthologia Graeca, 7.71, an epigram concerning the tomb of Archilochus.


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    Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [n8r p207]

    Luxuria.

    Licentiousness

    LXI.

    Eruca capripes redimitus tempora Faunus
    Immodicae Veneris symbola certa refert.
    Est eruca salax,[1] indexque libidinis hircus,
    Et satyri nymphas semper amare solent.[2]

    Goat-footed Faunus, his temples garlanded with the herb rocket, provides unmistakable symbols of desire without restraint. Rocket stimulates desire, the goat is a symbol of sexual appetite, and the satyrs are always lusting after the nymphs.

    Notes:

    1.  Rocket is described as herba salax at Ovid, Ars amatoria, 4.22. Pliny, Natural History, 10.83.182 and 19.44.154, lists it as an aphrodisiac.

    2.  Satyrs were creatures half-human, half-goat in form, like Faunus, and Pan with whom Faunus was often identified. See emblems 277 ([A56a277]), and 105 ([A56a105]). Cf. Horace, Odes, 3.18.1: ‘Faunus, you who lust after the fleeing nymphs’.


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