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EMBLEMA CLXXVIII [=177] .

Maledicentia.

Evil speaking

Archilochi[1] tumulo insculptas de marmore vespas
Esse ferunt,[2] linguae certa sigilla malae.

They say that on the tomb of Archilochus wasps were carved in marble, sure figures of an evil tongue.

Das CLXXVIII [=177] .

Ubelreden.

Es solln auffs Archilochs Grabstein
Wie man sagt Wespen ghauwen seyn
Sie seind ein gwiß zeichn und urkundt
Eins bösen Mauls und herben Mundt.

Notes:

1.  Archilochus was an eighth-century BC poet, author of much (now fragmentary) verse, including satire. This last was considered in antiquity to be excessively abusive and violent. See Horace, Ars Poetica, 79; also Erasmus, Adagia, 60 (Irritare crabrones).

2.  ferunt, ‘they say’: words suggested by Anthologia Graeca, 7.71, an epigram concerning the tomb of Archilochus.


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    Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [n8v p208]

    Desidia.

    Idleness.

    LXIII.

    Desidet in modio[1] Essaeus, speculatur & astra,
    Subtus & accensam contegit igne facem.[2]
    Segnities specie recti, velata cucullo,
    Non se, non alios utilitate iuvat.[3]

    The Theorist sits idly on the bushel-box and looks up at the stars, and underneath he covers up the flaming torch . Idleness, making a show of virtue, its head covered with a cowl, does no good to itself or anyone else.

    Notes:

    1.  Desidet in modio, ‘sits idly on the bushel-box’. See emblem 014 [A56a014].

    2.  accensam contegit igne facem: ‘covers up the flaming torch’. Cf. Matthew 5:15, ‘Neque accendunt lucernam et ponunt eam sub modio’ (nor do men light a candle and put it under a bushel).

    3.  Cf. Erasmus, Adagia, 1452, ‘Nec sibi nec aliis utilis’.


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