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OBDURANDUM ADVER-
sus urgentia.

Stand firm against pressure

Nititur in pondus palma & consurgit in arcum
Quo magis & premitur hoc mage tollit onus.[1]
Fert & odoratas bellaria dulcia glandes,[2]
Quis mensas inter primus habetur honos.
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [B3v]I puer & reptans ramis has collige, mentis
Qui constantis erit, praemia digna feret.

The wood of the palm-tree counteracts a weight and rises up into an arch. The heavier the burden pressing it down, the more it lifts it up. The palm-tree also bears fragrant dates, sweet dainties much valued when served at table. Go, boy, edge your way along the branches and gather them. The man who shows a resolute spirit will receive an appropriate reward.

Notes:

1.  The reaction of palm to a heavy weight is mentioned in various ancient sources, e.g. Pliny, Natural History 16.81.223; Aulus Gellius, Noctes Atticae 3.6. See also Erasmus, Parabolae p.263. It probably refers to a plank of palm-wood, rather than a branch of the living tree. A similar image is used in La Perriere, Morosophie, no. 83 ([FLPb083]).

2.  See Erasmus, Parabolae p.241: ‘the palm-tree, having bark with knife-sharp edges, is difficult to climb, but it bears delicious fruit’.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [E1r p65]

Un ne peut rien: Deux peuvent beaucoup.

Zenal tailla double image,[1] qui semble
Diomedes, & Ulysses ensemble.[2]
L’Un vault en force, & l’autre en bon conseil.
L’un ne peut rien, sans l’autre son pareil.
Quand ilz sont joinctz: victoire est seure, en somme.
Car ou l’esprit, ou la main fault à l’homme.

Force de corps ha besoing de conduycte d’esprit,
Et le bon esprit ha besoin de puissance, & adresse
de corps, pour executer grandes choses.

Notes:

1.  Two unidentified busts signed by Zenas are in the Capitoline Museum in Rome. Two sculptors of the second, or third century AD, possibly father and son, are known by this name.

2.   Odysseus and Diomedes collaborated in a successful night raid raid into Troy, for which see Homer, Iliad 10.218ff. See further Erasmus, Adagia 2051, ‘Duobus pariter euntibus’. (This title translates Iliad 10.224, a line which appears in Greek in the woodcut)


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