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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [O1v p210]

Concordia.

Concord

EMBLEMA XXXIX.

In bellum civile duces cùm Roma pararet,
Viribus & caderet Martia terra[1] suis:[2]
Mos fuit in partes turmis coeuntibus easdem,
Coniunctas dextras[3] mutua dona dari.
Foederis haec species: id habet concordia signum,
Ut quos iungit amor, iungat & ipsa manus.

When Rome was marshalling her generals to fight in civil war and that martial land was being destroyed by her own might, it was the custom for squadrons coming together on the same side to exchange joined right hands as gifts. This is a token of alliance; concord has this for a sign - those whom affection joins the hand joins also.

Notes:

1.  ‘Martial land’, a reference not only to Rome’s bellicose history but to the legend that Rome’s founder Romulus was the son of Mars, the god of war.

2.  Cf. Horace, Epodes 16.2, ‘Rome is being destroyed by her own might’ (written during the civil conflicts of 41 BC).

3.  These were fashioned in some kind of metal for use as tokens of friendship; see e.g. Tacitus, The Histories 1.54 and 2.8, (referring to another time of civil conflict, 69 - 70 AD). Alciato worked on the text of Tacitus and wrote some annotations.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [E1v p66]

Les tresfermes choses, ne povoir estre arrachées.

Quoy que la mer tous ses grandz flotz hors jette
Et le grand Turc le Danube à sec mette:[1]
Point toutesfois n’entrera conquereur,
Tant que Cesar Charles soit Empereur.[2]
Ainsi sur pied les grandz chenes demeurent,[3]
Quoy que les vents tombent fueilles, qui meurent.

Cest Embleme est faict à l’honneur de L’em-
pereur Charles cinquiesme, qui garda le grand
Turc
de passer à Vienne en Austriche.

Notes:

1.  The Turks invaded along the Danube and reached Hungary, winning the battle of Mohacs in 1526. When Alciato was writing, they continued to threaten Vienna and Central Europe.

2.  Emperor Charles V led the charge to recover the lost territory.

3.  Oaks were holy because sacred to Zeus, especially at his sanctuary at Dodona in Greece. CHECK([A58a188]). The image of the dry leaves is already present in the Greek poem, but see also Vergil, Aeneid 4.441-4.


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  • Asiatic races and peoples: Turks [32B33(TURKS)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Constancy, Tenacity; 'Costanza', 'Tenacità' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [53A21(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Stability, Firmness; 'Fermezza', 'Stabilimento', 'Stabilità' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [53A22(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Invincibility (+ emblematical representation of concept) [54A71(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • historical person (with NAME) other representations to which the NAME of a historical person may be attached (with NAME of person) [61B2(CHARLES V [of Holy Roman Empire])3] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • geographical names of countries, regions, mountains, rivers, etc. (names of cities and villages excepted) (with NAME) [61D(DANUBE)] Search | Browse Iconclass

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