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PARVAM CULINAM DUOBUS
ganeonibus non sufficere.

A small kitchen will not satisfy two gluttons

In modicis nihil est quod quis lucretur, & unum
Arbustum geminos non alit Erythacos,[1]
In tenui spes nulla lucri est, unoque residunt
Arbusto geminae non bene ficedulae.[2]

No one can make anything out of small resources. One clump of trees does not feed two robins. There is no hope of gain where means are small. Two flycatchers (lit. fig-peckers) don’t lodge well in one clump of trees.

Notes:

1. ‘One clump of trees does not feed two robins’. For this proverb, see Apostolius, Proverbs 11.68, where it is said to refer to ‘those who try to turn something small into a source of profit’.

2. In later editions, the text is split into two, with the last two lines called ‘Aliud’.


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  • Gluttony, Intemperance, 'Gula'; 'Gola', 'Ingordigia', 'Ingordigia overo Avidit৬ 'Voracitৠ(Ripa) ~ personification of one of the Seven Deadly Sins [11N35] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Competition, Rivalry, Emulation; 'Emulatione' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [54EE33(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Scarcity; 'Carestia' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [55BB2(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Selfishness; 'Interesse', 'Interesse proprio' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [57AA65(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass

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Les tresfermes choses, ne povoir estre arraches.

Quoy que la mer tous ses grandz flotz hors jette
Et le grand Turc le Danube sec mette:[1]
Point toutesfois n’entrera conquereur,
Tant que Cesar Charles soit Empereur.[2]
Ainsi sur pied les grandz chenes demeurent,[3]
Quoy que les vents tombent fueilles, qui meurent.

Cest Embleme est faict l’honneur de L’em-
pereur Charles cinquiesme, qui garda le grand
Turc
de passer Vienne en Austriche.

Notes:

1. The Turks invaded along the Danube and reached Hungary, winning the battle of Mohacs in 1526. When Alciato was writing, they continued to threaten Vienna and Central Europe.

2. Emperor Charles V led the charge to recover the lost territory.

3. Oaks were holy because sacred to Zeus, especially at his sanctuary at Dodona in Greece. CHECK([A58a188]). The image of the dry leaves is already present in the Greek poem, but see also Vergil, Aeneid 4.441-4.


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  • Asiatic races and peoples: Turks [32B33(TURKS)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Constancy, Tenacity; 'Costanza', 'Tenacità' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [53A21(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Stability, Firmness; 'Fermezza', 'Stabilimento', 'Stabilità' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [53A22(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Invincibility (+ emblematical representation of concept) [54A71(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • historical person (with NAME) other representations to which the NAME of a historical person may be attached (with NAME of person) [61B2(CHARLES V [of Holy Roman Empire])3] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • geographical names of countries, regions, mountains, rivers, etc. (names of cities and villages excepted) (with NAME) [61D(DANUBE)] Search | Browse Iconclass

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