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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [P2v p228]

El amor de si mesmo.

Ottava rhima.

Por ser Narcisso, tu de ti contento
En la flor de tu nombre estàs mudado.[1]
Es falta y manquedad de entendimiento
Ser uno de si mesmo afficionado.
El qual amor à varones sin cuento
En grande çeguedad ha derrocado
Porque dexadas las antiguas vias
Solo quieren seguir sus fantasias.

Notes:

1.  For the story of Narcissus, see Ovid, Metamorphoses, 3.344ff. On the flower, see Pliny, Natural History, 21.75.128: ‘there are two kinds of narcissus... The leafy one ... makes the head thick and is called narcissus from narce (numbness), not from the boy in the story’. (Cf. narcotic).


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [F5v p90]

Impudence deshontée.

Scylla diforme est dessus belle femme:
Dessoubz, de chiens abayans monstre infame,[1]
Les monstres sont Rapt, Avarice, Audace:
Et Scylla est qui n’ha vergoigne en face.

Par Scylla monstre marin, ou roch, ayant face vir-
ginalle, & le bas plein de testes de chiens abayans:
est signifiée la belle forme exterieure d’homme, ou
de femme, qui interieurement ha trois vices
de chien Rapine, Avarice, & Audace effrontée.

Notes:

1.  For Scylla’s half-transformation into barking dogs, see Ovid, Metamorphoses, 14.51ff.


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