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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Yy8v f360v as 359]

CUM IARVIS [=LARVIS] NON LUCTAN-
dum.[1]

Do not wrestle with the dead

Emblema 152.

AEacidae[2] moriens percussu cuspidis Hector[3].
Qui toties hosteis vicerat ante suos,
Comprimere haud potuit vocem, insultantibus illis,
Dum curru, & pedibus nectere vincla parant.
Distrahite ut libitum est: sic cassi luce leonis
Convellunt barbam vel timidi lepores.[4]

When he was dying from the wound dealt by the spear of Aeacus’ descendant, Hector, who had so often before defeated his own enemies, could not keep silent as they triumphed over him, while preparing to tie the ropes to chariot and feet. Tear me as you will, he said; when the lion is deprived of the light of life, even cowardly hares pluck his beard.

Notes:

1.  Cf. Erasmus, Adagia 153, Cum larvis luctari.

2.  ‘of Aeacus’ descendant’, i.e. ‘of Achilles’.

3.  Hector was the greatest warrior on the Trojan side in the Trojan War, killed in single combat by Achilles, the Greek champion. See Homer, Iliad 22.367ff. and 24.14ff. for Achilles’ desecration of Hector’s body, dragging it, tied by the feet behind his chariot, round the tomb of Patroclus.

4.  The last two lines are a translation of the two-line epigram Anthologia graeca 16.4, where, in Planudes’ text, the words are attributed to Hector in the heading.


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Section: LA REPUBLICQUE. View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [M4v p184]

Salut publicque.[1]

Aisculape[2] est sur les autelz perché,
Soubz ung cruel serpent, doulx Dieu caché:
Malades vont vers luy faire oraison,
Il leur faict signe, & donne guerison.

Aisculape souverain medicin, filz de Apollon inventeur
de Medicine, estimé Dieu de Medicine, Fut par une grande pe-
stilence transporté d’Epidaure (qui est Albanie) à Romme, en
guise d’ung serpent grand, & privé, sans mal faire: à la venue
duquel la Pestilence cessa, & tous malades furent gueriz. Par-
quoy par luy est signifié salut public. Ce que plus tost & mieulx
pourroit estre dict, du serpent d’erain, pendu par Moses au de-
sert, le regard duquel guerissoit ceulx qui estoient morts des
serpens enflamméz, prefigurant Jesuchrist pendu en croix. Le
vray Aisculape des ames.

Notes:

1.  In the 1549 French edition, this emblem has no woodcut.

2.  Aesculapius, son of Phoebus [Apollo] and god of medicine and healing. His main sanctuary and centre of healing was near Epidaurus in Greece. The god’s epiphany and symbol was a snake, and a number of sacred snakes were kept at the sanctuary. One of these was brought to Rome in 293 BC in hopes of stopping an outbreak of plague. The snake made its home on the Island in the Tiber, where a shrine and medical centre was subsequently built. See Ovid, Metamorphoses, 15.626ff.


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