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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [O6v p220]

Doctos doctis obloqui nefas esse.

It is wicked for scholars to wrangle with other scholars

XCIX.

Quid rapis heu Progne vocalem saeva Cicadam,
Pignoribusque tuis fercula dira paras?[1]
Ac stridula stridulam[2], vernam verna, hospita laedis
Hospitam, & aligeram penniger ales avem?
Ergo abice hanc praedam, nam musica pectora summum est,
Alterum ab alterius dente perire nefas.

Alas, Procne, why, cruel bird, do you sieze on the melodious cicada and prepare a dreadful banquet for your young? A whistler yourself, you harm the shrill singer; a summer visitor, you hurt another fine-weather caller; a guest, you harm a guest; a feathered bird, you hurt another winged creature. So let this prize go. It is the greatest sin for hearts devoted to the Muses to perish by one another’s tooth.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [O7r p221]

Ein gelerter solle dem andern
nit ubelreden.

XCIX.

Mich wundert Schwalb, das du fur speyß
Den Hewschreck raubst den jungen dein:
Ir habt doch bayd ein art und weyß,
Singt beyd nur in des Sommers schein,
Beyd gast bey unnß, und beyd in ein
Natur geziert: drumb toedt in nit.
Gelerte sollen alweg sein
Under in selbs in lieb und frid.

Notes:

1.  The reference is to the legend of Procne’s metamorphosis into a swallow. See [A50a070]. For swallows catching cicadas, see Aelian, De natura animalium 8.6.

2.  Textual variant: ‘Stridula stridentem’.


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Section: LA REPUBLICQUE. View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [M5r p185]

La Republicque delivrée.[1]

Caesar occis, la liberté vengée
Par le Duc Brut fut monnoie forgée,
Ou une dague, & ung bonnet estoient,
Tel que les serfz affranchiz le portoient.[2]

Brut Capitaine de la republicque Rommaine, pour memoi-
re d’avoir restitué la liberté oppressée par la domination de
Caesar, par luy occis, feit forger monnoie à la marque d’une
dague, denotant l’occision de Caesar, & d’ung bonnet, signifiant
la liberté de la Republicque. Car les libertins. (C’est à dire serfz
affranchiz) quand ilz sortoient de servitude, & entroient en li-
berté: Ilz prenoient le bonnet, Comme encore au jourdhuy font les
Maistres es arts à Paris, passans de scholasticque discipline, à mai-
trise, & laissans la ceincture enseigne de servitude, & subjection.

Notes:

1.  In the 1549 French edition, this emblem has no woodcut.

2.  Julius Caesar, who had become in effect the sole ruler of Rome, was assassinated on the Ides of March in 44 BC by Marcus and Decimus Brutus, Cassius and other conspirators. Alciato describes the well-known coin-type celebrating the restoration of republican government issued by Brutus after the murder. This bears the legend EID.MAR. (The Ides of March) across the lower section; above this, occupying the upper two thirds of the coin face, are two upright daggers with a cap of liberty between. Alciato had presumably seen or owned such a coin. He wrote a short treatise on ancient coins.


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  • republic; 'Governo della republica' (Ripa) [44B03] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • freedom ~ slavery [46A183] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Freedom, Liberty; 'Libertৠ(Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [51E11(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • male persons from classical history (with NAME) representations to which the NAME of a person from classical history may be attached [98B(BRUTUS, M.)3] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • death of Caesar, i.e. the murder of Caesar: he is slain in the Senate at the foot of Pompey's statue, exclaiming 'et tu Brute' [98B(CAESAR)68] Search | Browse Iconclass

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