Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [B7v]

IUSTA VINDICTA.

Just recompense

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [B8r]

Dum resydet cyclops sinuosi in faucibus antri,
Haec secum teneras concinit inter oves.
Pascite vos herbas, sociis ego pascar Achivis
Postremumque utin viscera nostra ferent
Audiit haec Ithacus Cyclopaque lumine cassum
Reddidit, en poenas ut suus author habet[1]. [2]

Sitting in the mouth of his arching cave, the Cyclops sang thus to himself amidst his gentle sheep: Do you feed on grass; I shall feed on the Greek companions, and last of all my belly shall get No-man. The man from Ithaca heard this and made the Cyclops eyeless. See how the one who plotted misfortune collects it himself!

Notes:

1.  A proverbial sentiment: cf. Erasmus, Adagia 3091, Di tibi dent tuam mentem.

2.  For the story of Ulysses (the man from Ithaca) in the Cyclops’ cave and his escape by blinding the Cyclops, see Homer, Odyssey 9.177 ff. Ulysses had told the Cyclops his name was No-man. (Utis l. 4).


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Q5v p250]

Amour de ses enfans.

Apostrophe.

Le Ramier faict son nid avant le ver,
Et ses oeufz couve au plus fort de l’hyver:
Pour ses petitz sa plume arrache, & nu
Il meurt de froid, quand l’hyver est venu.[1]
Progné, Medée, honte point ne te mord?
Veu qu’un oyseau pour les siens reçoit mort?[2]

La Palumbe qui se despoille, & meurt de froid pour
couvrir & eschaufer ses petiz venuz en hyver: donne
exemple de piteuse mere à toutes femmes: & faict honte à
celles qui laissent perir leurs enfans, par faulte de cure,
ou les tuent, comme feit Progné & Medée.

Notes:

1.  This is based on Anthologia graeca 9.95.

2.  Both Medea and Procne killed their own children. They are the legendary infamous child-killers. See [A58a064] n. for Procne, [A58a051] n. for Medea.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

 

Back to top

Privacy notice
Terms and conditions