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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [D5r]

PIETAS FILIORUM IN
parentes.

Honour from children towards parents

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [D5v]

Per medios hosteîs patriae cum ferret ab igne,
Aeneas humeris dulce parentis onus.
Parcite dicebat, vobis sene adorea rapto
Nulla erit, erepto sed patre summa mihi.[1]

When Aeneas was carrying the dear burden of his father on his shoulders through the midst of the enemy, out of the flames destroying his homeland, he kept saying: Spare us. Carrying off an old man will bring you no glory; but carrying my father to safety will be the greatest glory for me.

Notes:

1.  This is based on Anthologia graeca 9.163, a much translated epigram. It refers to the celebrated incident of Aeneas’ rescue of his old father at the sack of Troy, carrying him on his shoulders through the occupied and burning city. See Vergil, Aeneid 2.634ff.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Q5v p250]

Amour de ses enfans.

Apostrophe.

Le Ramier faict son nid avant le ver,
Et ses oeufz couve au plus fort de l’hyver:
Pour ses petitz sa plume arrache, & nu
Il meurt de froid, quand l’hyver est venu.[1]
Progné, Medée, honte point ne te mord?
Veu qu’un oyseau pour les siens reçoit mort?[2]

La Palumbe qui se despoille, & meurt de froid pour
couvrir & eschaufer ses petiz venuz en hyver: donne
exemple de piteuse mere à toutes femmes: & faict honte à
celles qui laissent perir leurs enfans, par faulte de cure,
ou les tuent, comme feit Progné & Medée.

Notes:

1.  This is based on Anthologia graeca 9.95.

2.  Both Medea and Procne killed their own children. They are the legendary infamous child-killers. See [A58a064] n. for Procne, [A58a051] n. for Medea.


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