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Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [F2v p84]

Iusta vindicta.[1]

Just recompense

XXXVII.

Dum residet Cyclops sinuosi in faucibus antri,
Haec secum teneras concinit inter oves:
Pascite vos herbas, sociis ego pascar Achivis,
Postremumque Utin viscera nostra ferent.
Audiit haec Ithacus, Cyclopaque lumine cassum
Reddidit, en poenas ut suus autor habet[2]. [3]

Sitting in the mouth of his arching cave, the Cyclops sang thus to himself amidst his gentle sheep: Do you feed on grass; I shall feed on the Greek companions, and last of all my belly shall get No-man. The man from Ithaca heard this and made the Cyclops eyeless. See how the one who plotted misfortune collects it himself!

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [F3r p85]

Juste vengeance.

XXXVII.

Cyclops homme ayant ung seul oeil,
Chantoit en gardant ses moutons:
Moutons mangez blette, ou cerfueil,
Je mangeray des valetons.
Ulyxes qui oyt ces tons,
Luy creva l’oeil d’une grande perche:
Ainsi ce fier Roy des gloutons.
Le mal recoit, que a aultruy cherche.

Notes:

1. Before the 1536 edition, Wechel editions used a different picture.

2. A proverbial sentiment: cf. Erasmus, Adagia 3091, Di tibi dent tuam mentem.

3. For the story of Ulysses (the man from Ithaca) in the Cyclops’ cave and his escape by blinding the Cyclops, see Homer, Odyssey 9.177 ff. Ulysses had told the Cyclops his name was No-man. (Utis l. 4).


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Bonte des enfans envers leurs Peres, ou Meres.

Prosopopoeie.

Quand Eneas portoit hors de peril
Son pere, Aulx Grecs pardonnez. (disoit il)
Gloire n’aurez ung vieil mort livr.
Grand gloire auray mon pere delivr.[1]

A ung filz est grand honneur de rendre ou sauver
la vie, celuy duquel il tient la vie apres Dieu, (qui
est son Pere) Qui est le meilleur, & plus louable acte
que jamais feit Eneas.

Notes:

1. This is based on Anthologia graeca 9.163, a much translated epigram. It refers to the celebrated incident of Aeneas’ rescue of his old father at the sack of Troy, carrying him on his shoulders through the occupied and burning city. See Vergil, Aeneid 2.634ff.


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