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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [F7v 94]

In fertilitatem[1] sibi ipsi damnosam.

Fruitfulness bringing its own destruction

XXXIX.

Ludibrium pueris lapides iacientibus, hoc me
In trivio posuit rustica cura nucem.
Quae laceris ramis perstrictoque ardua libro,
Certatim fundis per latus omne petor.
Quid sterili posset contingere turpius? eheu,
Infelix fructus in mea damna fero.[2]

A countryman’s care placed me, a nut tree, at this cross-roads, where I am the butt of stone-throwing boys. I have grown tall, but my branches are broken, my bark bruised, I am attacked with sling-stones, competing on every side. What worse fate could befall a barren tree? Alas, cursed tree that I am, I bear fruit to my own destruction.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [F8r p95]

Fruchbarkeyt yer selbs schedlich.

XXXIX.

Wie ste ich Nußbaum hye so kalt
Mit steck unnd stainn von allen plagt,
Fur wolthat gschicht mier schmach und gwalt,
Nicht ist an mier das sich nit klagt:
Ein baum der gantz kayn frucht nit tragt
Stet unverletzt in freyen veld,
Sih wie im mancher layd erjagt,
Der nutzt und frumbt der gantzen welt.

Notes:

1.  Textual variant: ‘foecunditatem’.

2.  This is a translation of Anthologia graeca 9.3, see also Aesop, Fables 152.


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Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Q6r p251]

Bonte des enfans envers leurs Peres, ou Meres.

Prosopopoeie.

Quand Eneas portoit hors de peril
Son pere, Aulx Grecs pardonnez. (disoit il)
Gloire n’aurez ung vieil à mort livré.
Grand gloire auray mon pere delivré.[1]

A ung filz est grand honneur de rendre ou sauver
la vie, à celuy duquel il tient la vie apres Dieu, (qui
est son Pere) Qui est le meilleur, & plus louable acte
que jamais feit Eneas.

Notes:

1.  This is based on Anthologia graeca 9.163, a much translated epigram. It refers to the celebrated incident of Aeneas’ rescue of his old father at the sack of Troy, carrying him on his shoulders through the occupied and burning city. See Vergil, Aeneid 2.634ff.


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