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Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [F7v p94]

Custodiendas virgines.

Girls must be guarded

XLII.

Vera haec effigies[1] innuptae est Palladis, eius
Hic Draco, qui dominae constitit ante pedes.
Cur divae comes hoc animal? custodia rerum
Huic data, sic lucos sacraque templa colit,[2]
Innuptas opus est cura asservare puellas
Pervigili, laqueos undique tendit amor.[3]

This is the true image of virgin Pallas. Her snake is here, positioned at his mistress’s feet. Why does this creature accompany the goddess? The task of guarding things was entrusted to it, and so it looks after groves and sacred temples. It is necessary to guard unmarried girls with ever-watchful care - Love lays his snares on every side.

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [F8r p95]

Vierges doibt l’on bien garder.

XLII.

Cest icy de Pallas l’ymaige,
Que ung dragon garde par grande cure
Affin qu’on n’y face dommaige,
Ce que n’est pas fait sans figure:
Car il monstre, que vierge pure
Se doibt garder soigneusement:
Veu qu’amour chasse de nature
La maculer honteusement.

Notes:

1. ‘Image of virgin Pallas’. Pallas Athene, virgin goddess and protectress of the city of Athens, represented with helmet, spear and aegis. Pallas Athene was equated with Minerva, the Roman goddess of wisdom. Pausanias, Periegesis 1.24.7 mentions such a statue with a snake.

2. See Macrobius, Saturnalia 1.20.3: ‘the snake with its keen and ever-watchful sight has assigned to it the custodianship of temples, shrines, oracles and treasures.’ Ancient Greek holy sites often housed a snake.

3. ‘Love lays his snares on every side’ - a proverbial saying.


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Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [Q7v p254]

Sur la statue de pudicit.

Penelop suyvre Ulysses vouloit.
Son pere Icar soy la retenoit.
L’ung offre Itaque, & l’autre Sparte en Grece:
L’amour du pere, & du mary la presse.
Parquoy se siet: les mains devant les yeulx,
Signe pudic l’ung d’estre aim myeulx.
Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [Q8r p255] Ce qu’entendant Icar: en signe tel
D’honte Pudicque eleva ung autel.[1]

Penelop est la plus renomme femme en
chastet, qui soit en toute l’escripture des
Grecz. Et pource son image fut eleve sur
ung autel, entre deux hommes, l’ung vieil,
qui, estoit son Pere Icar Prince de Sparte,
l’autre jeune qui estoit Ulysses son mary
Seigneur d’Itaque, tourne vers Ulysses:
mais toutesfois couvrant ses yeulx de ses
mains, par honte pudicque, de ce que licite-
ment est command par Nature: laisser pe-
re & mere, pour suyvre son party en ma-
riage.

Notes:

1. See Pausanias, Periegesis, 3.20.10, for this statue and the story behind it.


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