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CUPRESSUS.

The Cypress

Emblema. 197.

Indicat effigiem [=effigies] metae, nomenque cupressi
Tractandos parili conditione suos.[1]
Aliud.
Funesta est arbor, procerum monumenta Cupressus,
Quale apium plebis, comere fronde solet.[2]
Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [Mmm1r f457r as 460]Aliud.
Pulchra coma est, pulchro digestaeque ordine frondes:
Sed fructus nullos haec coma pulchra gerit.[3]

The cone-shaped form and the name ‘cypress’ indicate that one’s people should be dealt with on equal terms.
Other.
The cypress is a funereal tree. Its branches usually adorn the memorials of leading men as parsley-stems adorn those of humble people.
Other.
The foliage is beautiful, and the leaves all arranged in neat order, but this beautiful foliage bears no fruit.

Notes:

1. This refers to the supposed etymology, Greek κύειν and πάρισος ‘bear’,‘equal’.

2. See Pliny, Natural History, 20.44.113 for the use of parsley at funeral meals.

3. See Erasmus, Adagia, 4210 (Cyparissi fructus).


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La Marie au contagieux.

Apostrophe.

Dieu doint aulx bons mieulx qu’a toy (O Mezence[1]),
Qui achept has gendre grand despense:
Vieulx, veroll, villain, plein d’impropere,
Qu’est ce aultre chose (Or me dy cruel pere)
Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [R1r p257] Sinon corps vifz joindre aulx corps morts infectz
Renouvellant du Duc Touscan les faictz.[2]

Mezence Duc de Touscane par inhumai-
ne cruault, faisoit lyer les hommes vifz a-
vec les corps morts & puans, & la languir
jusque la mort, tellement que le mort
tuoit le vif. Laquelle inhumanite encore au
jourdhuy exercent plusieurs peres, meres,
& parens, qui marient inseparablement leurs
filles belles, saines, & entieres, gens verol-
lz, corrompuz, ladres, puans, podagres, &
vivants charoignes, sans povoir, ne espoir
de se separer, mais necessit de la lan-
guir jusqu’ la mort. De laquelle cruault
des Peres & Meres envers leurs enfans: n’en
est point de plus grande, toutesfois dequoy
on tienne moins de compte. Sur quoy Era-
sme
ha faict le beau Dialogue.
ΑΓΑΜΟΣ ΓΑΜΟΣ.

Notes:

1. Vergil, Georgics, 3.513.

2. See Vergil, Aeneid, 8.483-88, for the crimes of Mezentius, the Etruscan king who opposed Aeneas on his arrival in Italy. He inflicted a dreadful fate on his victims by tying them face to face with a corpse and leaving them to die.


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