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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [D7r p61]

Il se fault endurcir contre les ad-
versitez presentes.

Apostrophe.

Contre la charge hault la Palme s’eleve
Et croist tant plus, que sa charge est plus greve,[1]
Glandz odorans portant, & delectables,[2]
Ayans l’honneur premier es bonnes tables.
Or monte (enfant) es rameaulx le fruict pris:
Car Qui sera constant: aura le pris.

Pour quelque adversité, ou contrarieté qui advien-
ne, point ne fault laisser une bonne entreprinse, Mais
perseverer constamment jusque à fin heureuse.

Notes:

1.  The reaction of palm to a heavy weight is mentioned in various ancient sources, e.g. Pliny, Natural History 16.81.223; Aulus Gellius, Noctes Atticae 3.6. See also Erasmus, Parabolae p.263. It probably refers to a plank of palm-wood, rather than a branch of the living tree.

2.  See Erasmus, Parabolae p.241: ‘the palm-tree, having bark with knife-sharp edges, is difficult to climb, but it bears delicious fruit’.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [F2v f29v]

EMBLEMA XLIII.

Ἀνέχου καὶ ἀπέχου.[1]

Hold on and hold off

Et toleranda homini tristis fortuna ferendo
Et nimium foelix saepe timenda fuit.
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [F3r f30r]SUSTINE, Epictetus dicebat, & ABSTINE, oportet
Multa pati, illicitis absque tenêre manus.
Sic ducis imperium vinctus fert poplite taurus
In dextro, sic se continet à gravidis.

A man must bear unhappy chance by seeing it through, but too happy a lot has often proved fearful as well. Hold on, Epictetus used to say, and also, Hold off. One must endure many things and also keep one’s hands away from what is not allowed. Even so the bull submits to the herdsman’s will, chained at the right knee, and so keeps away from the pregnant cows.

Das XLIII.

Leid und meid.

Der Mensch muß nicht allein sböß glück
Mit gedult tragen offt und dick
Sonder es auch zu förchten ist
Das uberauß gut glück zur frist.
Leid und meid Epictetus spricht
Dann man zu leiden muß seyn gricht
Und von allen verbotnen dhend
Abziehen und enthalten behend:
Also der Stier am Rechten Fuß
Leid das er angefesselt seyn muß
Also thut er enthalten sich
Von tragenden Küen und Vich.

Notes:

1.  Aulus Gellius, Noctes Atticae, 17.19.5-6.


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