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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [K1v p146]

Paupertatem summis ingeniis obesse
ne provehantur.[1]

Poverty prevents the advancement of the best of abilities

EMBLEMA CXX.

Dextra tenet lapidem, manus altera sustinet alas:
Ut me pluma levat, sic grave mergit onus.
Ingenio poteram superas volitare per arces,
Me nisi paupertas invida deprimeret.

My right hand holds a rock, the other bears wings. As the feathers lift me, so the heavy weight drags me down. By my mental gifts I could have flown through the heights of heaven, if malign poverty did not hold me back.

Notes:

1.  For the sentiment cf. Juvenal, Satires 3.164-5: ‘it is hard for people to rise when straitened circumstances stand in the way of their natural abilities.’


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  • Progression, Forward Movement (+ emblematical representation of concept) [51L4(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Rest, Immobility, Stasis (+ emblematical representation of concept) [51LL1(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Regression, Backward Movement (+ emblematical representation of concept) [51LL4(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Talent (+ emblematical representation of concept) [52A13(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Hindrance, Obstruction (+ emblematical representation of concept) [54EE2(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Poverty; 'Povertà', 'Povertà del doni', 'Povertà in uno ch'habbia bell'ingegno' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [55BB1(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Ambition; 'Ambitione', 'Amor di Fama' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [56F11(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass

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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [G7v f42v]

EMBLEMA LXIII.

Omnia mea mecum porto.[1]

All that is mine I carry with me.

Hunnus inops, Scythicique miserrimus accola ponti,[2]
Ustus perpetuò livida membra gelu.
Qui Cereris non novit opes, nec dona Lyaei,[3]
Et praeciosa tamen, stragula semper habet.
Nam Murrinae illum perstringunt undique pelles,
Lumina sola patent, caetera opertus agit.
Sic furem haud metuit, sic ventos temnit & imbres,
Tutus apudque viros, tutus apudque Deos.

The impoverished Hun, wretched dweller beside the Scythian Sea, whose limbs are always blue and burnt by frost, has no knowledge of Ceres’ bounty or of the gifts of Lyaeus, yet he always has luxurious wraps. Ermine furs hug him round on every side; only his eyes are visible, he spends his life covered everywhere else. So he has no fear of the thief, he pays no attention to wind and rain, safe in the presence of men and in the presence of gods.

Das LXIII.

All mein Gut trag ich mit mir.

Der dürfftig Hunn so sein sitz hat
An dem Scytischen Meeres gstat
Und allzeit wirt geplaget sehr
Mit uberlestiger kelt schwer
Der nicht weiß umb Cereris hab
Noch umb des Bacchi Schenck und gab
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [G8r f43r] Ist er jedoch nit on ein beut
Dann er hat vil der köstlichen Heut
An allen orten umb und umb
Ist er bedeckt in einer sumb
Mit Zobeln und Mardern gefülln
Die Augen im allein hrauß schülln
Also förcht er kein Dieb noch Wind
Verachtet auch die Regen gschwind
Ist also vor Menschen verwart
Und vor den Göttern ungespart.

Notes:

1.  These words, (according to Cicero, Paradoxa Stoicorum, 1.8, and Seneca, Epistulae morales, 9.19), were used by the philosophers Bias and Stilbo, when they had apparently lost everything; also by the poet Simonides when shipwrecked (Phaedrus, 4.22.14).

2.  The Pontus Scythicus was one Classical name for the Black Sea (a.k.a. Pontus Euxinus), on the northern shores of which dwelt various barbarian tribes, from Scythians to Goths to Huns.

3.  Cereris...opes,...dona Lyaei, ‘Ceres’ bounty...gifts of Lyaeus’, i.e. corn and wine, given to mankind by Ceres and Bacchus (Lyaeus, the relaxer, or deliverer from care).


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