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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Q6r p251]

Bonte des enfans envers leurs Peres, ou Meres.

Prosopopoeie.

Quand Eneas portoit hors de peril
Son pere, Aulx Grecs pardonnez. (disoit il)
Gloire n’aurez ung vieil à mort livré.
Grand gloire auray mon pere delivré.[1]

A ung filz est grand honneur de rendre ou sauver
la vie, à celuy duquel il tient la vie apres Dieu, (qui
est son Pere) Qui est le meilleur, & plus louable acte
que jamais feit Eneas.

Notes:

1.  This is based on Anthologia graeca 9.163, a much translated epigram. It refers to the celebrated incident of Aeneas’ rescue of his old father at the sack of Troy, carrying him on his shoulders through the occupied and burning city. See Vergil, Aeneid 2.634ff.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [H5v f48v]

EMBLEMA LXXII.

Gratiam referendam.

Show gratitude.

Aërio insignis pietate Ciconia nido,
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [H6r f49r]Investes pullos pignora grata fovet.
Taliaque expectat sibi munera mutua reddi,
Auxilio hoc quoties mater egebit anus.
Nec pia spem soboles fallit, sed fessa parentum
Corpora fert humeris, praestat & ore cibos.[1]

The stork, famed for its dutiful care, in its airy nest cherishes its featherless chicks, its dear pledges of love. The mother bird expects that the same kind of service will be shown her in return, whenever she needs such help in her old age. Nor does the dutiful brood disappoint this hope, but bears its parents’ weary bodies on its wings and offers food with its beak.

Das LXXII.

Man sol danckbar seyn.[2]

In lüfften hoch so nist embor
Der Storck in treuwen hat empfor
Und liebt sein jungen also blutt
Die er doch fleissig nehren thut
In der hoffnung das gleicher weiß
Von in widerfar so er greiß
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [H6v f49v] Werdt und mit alter bladen groß
Irer hülff wider werde gnoß
Diese hoffnung der elter mildt
Ist nit umb sonst ist nit verspilt,
Dann sie die elter also ald
Auff iren rucken tragen bald
Oesent[3] herwider sie auch Son
Als sie inen zuvor hond gthon.

Notes:

1.  See Pliny, Natural History 10.32.63: cranes care for their parents’ old age in their turn. See also Aelian, De natura animalium 3.23.

2.  The German in certain parts of this emblem is particularly puzzling.

3.  Oesent seems meaningless. Possibly read De sent = Die seind/sind


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