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EMBLEMA CV.

In oblivionem patriae.

Forgetting one’s country

Iam dudum missa patria, oblitusque tuorum,
Quos tibi seu sanguis, sive paravit amor.
Romam habitas: nec cura domum subit ulla reverti.
Aeternae tantùm te capit urbis honos.
Sic Ithacûm praemissa manus[1] dulcedine loci [=loti]
Liquerat & patriam, liquerat atque ducem.

You have long since given up your country and, forgetful of your own people given you by blood or love, you dwell in Rome, and no thought of returning home ever occurs to you. Only the glory of the eternal city possesses you. Even so the advance party of Ithacans, through the sweetness of the lotus, had abandoned homeland and abandoned leader too.

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Das CV.

Wider die vergessenheit deß Vat-
terlands.

Dein Heimat und Vatterland hast
Ein lange zeit verlassen fast
Und deren gar vergessen schier
Die dein freundt warn und verwandt dir.
Zu Rom wonstu und nit gedenckst
Daß du auch einmal zu hauß lendst
Sonder die schön zierd und gestalt
Helt dich allein auff der Statt alt
Also Ulyssis außgschickt rot
Als sie versuchen thet das Lot
Verliessen irn Obersten Herrn
Und gedachten nit heim zu kern.

Notes:

1.  Ithacum...manus, ‘party of Ithacans’. See Homer, Odyssey 9.83ff. for the story of Ulysses’ crew (men from the island of Ithaca) in the land of the Lotus Eaters, where those who ate the lotus had no more thought of returning home. See Erasmus, Adagia 1662 Lotum gustavit.


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EMBLEMA CIII.

Αντέρος, Amor virtutis alium cupidinem
superans.

Anteros, Love of Virtue, conquering the other Love.

Aligerum aligeroque inimicum pinxit Amori,
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [L1r f68r]Arcu arcum, atque ignes igne domans Nemesis.[1]
Ut quae aliis fecit patiatur, at hic puer olim
Intrepidus gestans tela,[2] miser lachrymat.
Ter spuit, inque sinus imos[3] (res mira) crematus [=crematur]
Igne ignis, furias odit Amoris Amor.

Nemesis has fashioned a form with wings, a foe to Love with his wings, subduing bow with bow and flames with flame, so that Love may suffer what he has done to others. But this boy, once so bold when he was carrying his arrows, now weeps in misery and has spat three times low on his breast. A wondrous thing - fire is being burned with fire, Love is loathing the frenzies of Love.

Das CIII.

Wider Lieb, Die Lieb der Tugend uber-
windt die ander Lieb.

Die Göttin Nemesis hat gmalt
Der Liebe Feind in gleiche gstalt
Mit Flügeln der der Lieb Feuwr und Pfeil
Mit seim Bogn und Feuwr hat in eil
Umbbracht, und wie er andrn hat gthon
Widerfert im jetzt gleicher lohn:
Dieser Knab als er trug sein Gschoß
Ward er kün jetzund flannt er bloß
Und speit in sein Gern dreymol
Ein wundersach, daß das feuwr sol
Das Feuwer verzeren, und daß die
Lieb sol hassen der lieb Brunst hie.

Notes:

1.  This is a translation of Anthologia graeca 16.251. The punishment of Cupid (Amor) for the hurt he inflicts on men is a common theme in Hellenistic Greek poetry and art. This punishment is often carried out by Nemesis, goddess of retribution. Cupid’s arrows and torch are taken from him and destroyed, and he himself is bound, beaten, burned, and pricked with his own arrows.

2.  ‘when he was carrying his arrows’. The corresponding line of the Greek text reads γευσάμενος βελέων, ‘getting a taste of the arrows’, and Alciato probably wrote here gustans tela, ‘tasting the arrows’, though this reading is not attested in the editions. Velius’ translation of the same poem in Selecta epigrammata reads expertus spicula, ‘experiencing the darts’.

3.  ‘has spat three times low on his breast’. This is a charm to avert the anger of Nemesis for some overbold thought or action. See Erasmus, Adagia 594, In tuum ipsius sinum inspue.


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