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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [L3v f70v]

EMBLEMA CVII.

In Astrologos.

Against astrologers

Icare per superos qui raptus & aëra, donec
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [L4r f71r]In mare praecipitem caera liquata daret,[1]
Nunc te caera eadem, fervensque resuscitat[2] ignis,[3]
Exemplo ut doceas dogmata certa tuo.
Astrologus[4] caveat quicquam praedicere, praeceps
Nam cadet impostor, dum super[5] astra volat.

Icarus, you were carried through the heights of heaven and through the air, until the melted wax cast you headlong into the sea. Now the same wax and the burning fire raise you up again, so that by your example you may provide sure teaching. Let the astrologer beware of prediction. Headlong will the imposter fall, as he flies beyond the stars.

Das CVII.

In die Sternseher.

Icare der du gfaren bist
In der Höch durch die Wolcken mit list
Biß daß das Wachß wurd weich und schmoltz
Und du ins Meer filst wie ein Holtz?
Nun ermundert dich wider jetz
Eben diß wachß und feuwrig hitz
Das du gebest ein gwisse lehr
Durch dein Exempel uns jetzt her
Damit sich in dAstronomey
Ein jeder hüt war zusagen frey
Dann der mit seiner Kunst ist schnell
Ins Himmels lauff, kompt in ungfell.

Notes:

1.  Cf. Anthologia graeca 16.107, a poem on a bronze statue of Icarus, translated by Alciato at Selecta epigrammata (Cornarius, ed.) p.333. Icarus and his father Daedalus (Emblem 29 [A67a029] notes) escaped from King Minos of Crete on wings of feathers and wax. Icarus was over-bold and flew too near the sun; when his wings melted, he crashed into the Icarian Sea and was drowned. See Ovid, Metamorphoses 8.183ff. Icarus, like Phaethon (Emblem 109 [A67a109]) was a type of those who do not keep to their proper station.

2.  Corrected from the errata.

3.  ‘same wax...fire’: a reference to the cire perdue method of casting statues.

4.  Corrected from the errata.

5.  Corrected from the errata.


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EMBLEMA CIIII.

ἀντέρως, id est, amor virtutis. GREEK

Anteros, that is, love of virtue

Διαλογιστικῶς

In dialogue form.

Dic ubi sunt incurvi arcus? ubi tela Cupido?
Mollia queis iuvenum figere corda soles?[1]
Fax ubi tristis? ubi pennae? tres unde corollas
Fert manus? unde aliam tempora cincta gerunt?
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [L1v f68v] Haud mihi vulgari est, (hospes) cum Cypride quicquam
Ulla voluptatis nos neque forma tulit,
Sed pueris [=puris] hominum succendo mentibus ignes
Disciplinae: animos astraque ad alta traho.
Quatuor aequè ipsa texo virtute corollas,[2]
Quare [=Quarum] quae Sophiae est, tempora prima tegit.

Tell me, where are your arching bows, where your arrows, Cupid, the shafts which you use to pierce the tender hearts of the young? Where is your hurtful torch, where your wings? Why does your hand hold three garlands? Why do your temples wear a fourth? - Stranger, I have nothing to do with common Venus, nor did any pleasurable shape bring me forth. I light the fires of learning in the pure minds of men and draw their thoughts to the stars on high. I weave four garlands out of virtue’s self and the chief of these, the garland of Wisdom, wreathes my temples.

Das CIIII.

Wider Lieb, das ist der Tugend lieb.

Lieber Cupido sag mir frey
Wo doch dein krummer bogen sey?
Und deine Pfeil damit du rürst
Und der weichen Jüngling Hertz bürst?
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [L2r f69r] Wo ist dein wütend und brinnend Flamm
Wo seind dein Fettich wundersam
Woher bringst die drey Krentz am Arm
Darzu den umb deine Schläff warm?
Ich hab weder gmein theil noch ichts
Lieber freundt mit Frauw Venus zicht
Es ist auch ein groß underscheid
An der form, gstalt der wollust beid:
Ich entzünd in der Menschen Hertz
Die reine brunst der Zucht on schertz
Und für deß Menschen mut und sinn
Ubersich in die Wolcken hin
Und flicht auß den tugenden schon
Vier Krentzlein zierlich das thut stohn
Zu oberst auff dem Haupt, das gehört
Und sol seyn der Weißheit ongwert.

Notes:

1.  This is a translation of Anthologia graeca 16.201.

2.  ‘I weave four garlands out of virtue’s self’, a reference to the four cardinal virtues, justice, temperance, courage and wisdom.


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