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AMOR VIRTUTIS.

Love of virtue.

Emblema 108.

Dic ubi sunt incurvi arcus? ubi tela Cupido?
Mollia queis iuvenum figere corda soles?[1]
Fax ubi tristis? ubi pennae? tres unde corollas
Fert manus? unde aliam tempora cincta gerunt?
Haud mihi vulgari est, hospes, cum Cypride quicquam,
Ulla voluptatis nos neque forma tulit.
Sed puris hominum succendo mentibus ignes
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Mm1r f273r] Disciplinae, animos astraque ad alta traho.
Quattuor equè[2] ipsa texo virtute corollas,[3]
Quarum, quae Sophiae est, tempora prima tegit.

Tell me, where are your arching bows, where your arrows, Cupid, the shafts which you use to pierce the tender hearts of the young? Where is your hurtful torch, where your wings? Why does your hand hold three garlands? Why do your temples wear a fourth? - Stranger, I have nothing to do with common Venus, nor did any pleasurable shape bring me forth. I light the fires of learning in the pure minds of men and draw their thoughts to the stars on high. I weave four garlands out of virtue’s self and the chief of these, the garland of Wisdom, wreathes my temples.

Notes:

1.  This is a translation of Anthologia graeca 16.201.

2.  Corrected by hand in the Glasgow copy.

3.  ‘I weave four garlands out of virtue’s self’, a reference to the four cardinal virtues, justice, temperance, courage and wisdom.


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EMBLEMA CV.

In oblivionem patriae.

Forgetting one’s country

Iam dudum missa patria, oblitusque tuorum,
Quos tibi seu sanguis, sive paravit amor.
Romam habitas: nec cura domum subit ulla reverti.
Aeternae tantùm te capit urbis honos.
Sic Ithacûm praemissa manus[1] dulcedine loci [=loti]
Liquerat & patriam, liquerat atque ducem.

You have long since given up your country and, forgetful of your own people given you by blood or love, you dwell in Rome, and no thought of returning home ever occurs to you. Only the glory of the eternal city possesses you. Even so the advance party of Ithacans, through the sweetness of the lotus, had abandoned homeland and abandoned leader too.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [L2v f69v]

Das CV.

Wider die vergessenheit deß Vat-
terlands.

Dein Heimat und Vatterland hast
Ein lange zeit verlassen fast
Und deren gar vergessen schier
Die dein freundt warn und verwandt dir.
Zu Rom wonstu und nit gedenckst
Daß du auch einmal zu hauß lendst
Sonder die schön zierd und gestalt
Helt dich allein auff der Statt alt
Also Ulyssis außgschickt rot
Als sie versuchen thet das Lot
Verliessen irn Obersten Herrn
Und gedachten nit heim zu kern.

Notes:

1.  Ithacum...manus, ‘party of Ithacans’. See Homer, Odyssey 9.83ff. for the story of Ulysses’ crew (men from the island of Ithaca) in the land of the Lotus Eaters, where those who ate the lotus had no more thought of returning home. See Erasmus, Adagia 1662 Lotum gustavit.


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