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Sottie.

APOSTROPHE.

T’esbahiz tu, si Ote je te nomme,
Quoy que tu sois des Otons extraict homme?
Ote oyseau ha d’oreille, & plume autant
Qu’une Chouete:[1] & est prinse en saultant:
Les folz aiséz à prendre.[2] Otes on dict.
Pren doncque ce nom pour toy, car il te duyct.

Cest Embleme ne vient pas proprement
au Francois: comme au Latin, pour ne
pouvoir rendre une certaine allusion des
noms Latins, aulxquelz les Francois ne
peuvent correspondre. Mais en somme il
signifie que à ung sot, nom sot est con-
venable.

Notes:

1.  See Pliny, Natural History, 11.50.137: only the eagle-owl and the long-eared owl have feathers like ears (the little owl - chouette - does not in fact have ear-tufts).

2.  See Pliny, Natural History, 10.33.68: ‘The otus is an imitator of other birds and a hanger-on, performing a kind of dance; like the little owl, it is easily caught, when its attention is fixed on one person while another person circles round it’. See also Plutarch, Moralia, Bruta animalia ratione uti, 951E.


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    Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [L8v f75v]

    EMBLEMA CXV.

    In victoriam dolo partam.

    On victory won by guile.

    Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [M1r f76r]

    Aiacis tumulum lachrymis ego perluo virtus,
    Heu misera albentes dilacerata comas.
    Scilicet hoc restabat adhuc, ut iudice Graeco[1]
    Vincerer: & causa stet potiore dolus.[2]

    I, Virtue, bedew with tears the tomb of Ajax, tearing, alas, in my grief my whitening hairs. This was all it needed - that I should be worsted with a Greek as judge, and that guile should appear to have the better cause.

    Das CXV.

    Von Sig durch betrug bekommen.

    Ich die Tugend mit zehern naß
    Wasch deß Helden Ajacis Graß,[3]
    Allda er dann begraben ligt
    Und rauff auß mein schönes Har dick
    Dann das allein noch ubrig war
    Das ich beym Griechischen Richter zwar
    Das Recht gewesn, aber es gilt
    Mehr dann das recht der betrug milt.

    Notes:

    1.  The Greek assembly awarded the arms of the dead Achilles to the cunning and eloquent Ulysses, not the brave and straight-forward Ajax. For Ajax’s subsequent suicide, see Emblem 66 [A67a066].

    2.  See Anthologia graeca 7.145.

    3.  While ‘Gras’ (Engl.: grass) is a possible reading, ‘Grab’ (Engl.: grave), although it disturbs the rhyme, is more likely: an interesting confusion between ‘b’ and the German ‘ß’.


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