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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Ddd7r f399r as 397]

PAREM DELINQUENTIS, ET
suasoris culpam esse.

The one who urges wrongdoing is as guilty as the one who does the wrong

Emblema 172.

Praeconem lituo perflantem classica victrix
Captivum in tetro carcere turma tenet.
Queis ille excusat, quod nec sit strenuus armis,
Ullius aut saevo laeserit ense latus.
Huic illi: Quin ipse magis timidissime peccas,
Qui clangore alios aeris in arma cies.[1]

The victorious troop holds captive in a foul dungeon a herald, who sounds military commands on his trumpet. To them he makes his excuses - he is no strong fighting man and has wounded no one’s side with a cruel sword. They reply: You abject coward, you are in fact more guilty, for you with the sound of your trumpet stir up others to fight.

Notes:

1.  This is a version of Aesop, Fables 325.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [M6v f81v]

EMBLEMA CXXV.

Alius peccat, alius plectitur.

One sins and another is punished

Arripit ut lapidem catulus, morsuque fatigat,
Nec percussori mutua damna facit.
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [M7r f82r]Sic plerique sinunt veros elabier hosteis:
Et quos nulla gravat noxia, dente petunt.[1]

A puppy seizes the stone and worries it with his teeth and does not bite back at the one who threw it. Even so, most people allow the true enemy to escape and bite those who carry no burden of guilt.

Das CXXV.

Einer sündigt der ander büst.

Gleich wie ein Hund der mit eim Stein
Geworffen wirt, den Stein allein
Anfelt und beist in zorniglich
Dem der in gworffen hat thut er nicht
Also findt man deren vil
Die dHauptsächer lohnt auß dem spil
Und fallen allein diese an
So wider sie nicht habn gethan.

Notes:

1.  Cf. Aesop, Fables 235, where bees sting the wrong person. See Erasmus, Adagia 153, Cum larvis luctari, where the ‘puppy’ comparison is quoted from Aristotle (Rhetoric 3, 4). See also Plato, Republic 5.469E.


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