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Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [L8v p176]

Ἀντέρως, id est, Amor virtutis.[1]

Anteros, that is, love of virtue

Dic ubi sunt incurvi arcus? ubi tela Cupido?
Mollia queis iuvenum figere corda soles?[2]
Fax ubi tristis? ubi pennae? tres unde corollas
Fert manus? unde aliam tempora cincta gerunt?
Haud mihi vulgari est hospes cum Cypride quicquam,
Ulla voluptatis nos neque forma tulit.
Sed puris hominum succendo mentibus ignes
Disciplinae, animos astraque ad alta traho.
Quatuor eque ipsa texo virtute corollas,[3]
Quarum quae sophiae est, tempora prima tegit.

Tell me, where are your arching bows, where your arrows, Cupid, the shafts which you use to pierce the tender hearts of the young? Where is your hurtful torch, where your wings? Why does your hand hold three garlands? Why do your temples wear a fourth? - Stranger, I have nothing to do with common Venus, nor did any pleasurable shape bring me forth. I light the fires of learning in the pure minds of men and draw their thoughts to the stars on high. I weave four garlands out of virtue’s self and the chief of these, the garland of Wisdom, wreathes my temples.

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [M1r p177]

Amour de vertus.

Cupido, ou est larc & flesches dont tu tires?
Ta torche ardent, tes esles dou vient que les retires?
Et que as quatre chappeaux, ung au chef, au bras trois?
Vecy pourquoy: Venus na rien en mes destrois:
De doctrine fais feu, es gens de scavoir chaulx:
Et eslieve leurs sens jusques vers les cieulx haulx.
De vertus ay dresse les chappeaux que je tiens.
Moral, & naturel, que en Logique retiens.
Sapience est sur tous, que plus de soulas preste:
Quest notee au chappeau que jay dessus la teste.

Notes:

1. In the first Wechel edition in 1534, the figure of Anteros wrongly had wings which were subsequently removed.

2. This is a translation of Anthologia graeca 16.201.

3. ‘I weave four garlands out of virtue’s self’, a reference to the four cardinal virtues, justice, temperance, courage and wisdom.


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Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [P6v f105v]

EMBLEMA CLXIIII [=163] .

In adulatores.

Flatterers

Semper hiat, semper tenuem qua vescitur auram,
Reciprocat Chamaeleon[1],
Et mutat faciem, varios sumitque colores,
Praeter rubrum, vel candidum,[2]
Sic & Adulator populari vescitur aura,[3]
Hiansque cuncta devorat.
Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [P7r f106r]Et solum mores imitatur principis atros,
Albi & pudici nescius.

The Chameleon is always breathing in and out with open mouth the bodiless air on which it feeds; it changes its appearance and takes on various colours, except for red and white. - Even so the flatterer feeds on the wind of popular approval and gulps down all with open mouth. He imitates only the black features of the prince, knowing nothing of the white and pure.

Das CLXIIII [=163] .

Vergleichung der Schmeichler und
Zutttler.

Stts gint und schnappet nach dem lufft
Der Rattedex so lebt vom dufft
Verkehrt sein gstalt und nimpt an gschwind
All farbn, on die rot und wei sind
Also auch der schmeichler sich nehrt
De gmeinen gsangs uns als verzert
Folgt nur der Herren helich sit
Und der schn und zchtigen nit.

Notes:

1. This creature was supposed to feed only on air, keeping its mouth wide open to suck it in. See Pliny, Natural History 8.51.122. For the chameleon cf. Erasmus, Parabolae pp.144, 241, 252.

2. ‘except for red and white’. See Pliny, ib.

3. ‘the wind of popular approval’. This is a common metaphor in Latin, e.g. Horace, Odes 3.2.20, ‘at the behest of the wind of popular approval.’


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