Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [M5v p186]

De la vie humaine.

Apostrophe.

Pleure (Heraclit) la vie de ce monde:
Car plus en mal que jamais elle abonde.
Ry Democrit, si tu ris onquesmais:
Car plus y ha mocquer que jamais.
Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [M6r p187] Cela voyant ne say que faire doy.
Avec toy rire, ou plorer avec toy.[1]

Heraclit perdit les yeulx force
de plorer les calamitez du monde,
Democrit se fendit la gueulle jus-
que aulx oreilles, force de rire
des follies du monde. Or est il enco
re doubte s’il y ha plus plorer, ou
plus ha [=a] rire, des maulx, ou des fol-
lies qui y sont, ou lequel estoit le
plus sage, ou le plus fol des deux.

Notes:

1. This is a translation of Anthologia graeca 9.148. For Heraclitus, cf. [A58a016]. For the contrast between the despairing tears of Heraclitus (who withdrew from human society) and the sardonic laughter of Democritus when faced with the folly of men, see, among many sources, e.g. Juvenal, Satires 10, 28ff.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [R6r f121r]

EMBLEMA CXCIII [=192] .

Are quandoque salutem redimen-
dam.

Sometimes money must be spent to purchase safety

Et pedibus segnis, tumida & propendulus alvo,
Hac tamen insidias effugit arte fiber.
Mordicus ipse sibi medicata[1] virilia vellit,
Atque abicit, sese gnarus ob illa peti.
Huius ab exemplo disces non parcere rebus,
Et vitam ut redimas, hostibus aera dare.[2]

Though slow of foot and with swollen belly hanging down, the beaver nonetheless escapes the ambush by this trick: it tears off with its teeth its testicles, which are full of a medicinal substance, and throws them aside, knowing that it is hunted for their sake. - From this creature’s example you will learn not to spare material things, and to give money to the enemy to buy your life.

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [R6v f121v]

Das CXCIII [=192] .

Man sol zu zeiten kein Gelt ansehen
da man sich ledige.

Ein Biber ob er wol ist trg
Auff sein Fn und hat ein bauch, lg
Jedoch so kan er artlich frey
Der Hnd empfliehen gro geschrey
Sein Hdlin er im selbs hrau reist
Und herab hauwt dieweil er weist
Da man darumb nachstellen thut
Im, dann in der Artzney seinds gut
An diesem nim ein Beyspil ebn
Das du zu erretten dein lebn
Vor deinem Feind kein Gut noch Gelt
Erkargen noch ersparen slt.

Notes:

1. Corrected from the errata.

2. This is based on Aesop, Fables 153, where the same moral is drawn. For the information about the beaver, see Pliny, Natural History 8.47.109; Isidore, Etymologiae (Origines) 12.2.21.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

 

Back to top