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Edera.

Ivy

Emblema cciiii.

Haudquaquam arescens ederae est arbuscula, Cisso[1]
Quae puero Bacchum dona dedisse ferunt:
Errabunda, procax, auratis fulva corymbis,
Exterius viridis, caetera pallor habet.
Hinc aptis vates cingunt sua tempora sertis:[2]
Pallescunt studiis, laus diuturna viret.

There is a bushy plant which never withers, the ivy which Bacchus, they say, gave as a gift to the boy Cissos. It goes where it will, uncontrollable; tawny where the golden berry-clusters hang; green on the outside but pale everywhere else. Poets use it to wreathe their brows with garlands that fit them well - poets are pale with study, but their praise remains green for ever.

Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[Cc4v f280v]

HEdera perpetuÚ viret, tenax est, eŪque parti mo-
lesta cui haeret, corymbos aureos producit, ex-
tra viridis, in caeteris pallescens, poŽtarum condi-
tionem repraesentat, qui haerent studiis, sibŪque in-
terdum nocent, quÚd ferŤ corporeis exercitationi-
bus careant: famam tamen nominis nunquam mori-
turam, quasi mercedem auream exspectant. solantur
enim se, & studiorum molestias atque difficultates
sempiternae laudis opinione levant.

Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[Cc5r f281r]

Le lierre.

LE lierre en verdeur est plaisant,
Dont Bacchus fit un beau present
Au jeune Cissus: & se perche
Contremont: ses grains en couleur
Sont comme d’or: est en palleur
Verd dedans, embrasser il cerche:
Les PoŽtes en font des chappeaux
Et bouquets, dont ils se coronnent:
Palles ils sont, mais ils se donnent
Des los & bruits tousjours nouveaux.

LE lierre est tousjours verdoyant, il tient
serrť & s’entortille faisant tort ŗ la par-
tie oý il s’attache, produit des grains ŗ cou-
leur d’or, en dehors verd, par tout est pal-
lissant: ce que remarque la condition des poŽ-
tes, lesquels sont tousjours attachez aux e-
studes, & se font quelque fois tort, d’autant
qu’ils ne prennent aucun exercice du corps:
ils se promettent toutesfois un bruit & re-
nommee qui ne faudra jamais, comme une
precieuse recompense: ainsi sont ils consolez
d’esperance, & soulagent les chagrins & dif-
ficultez de leurs estudes par l’opinion qu’ils
ont d’une louange immortelle.

Notes:

1.Κισσός is the Greek word for ‘ivy’. For the story of Cissos, beloved of Bacchus, and his transformation into the ivy, see Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 12.188ff.

2.vates cingunt sua tempora, ‘Poets use it to wreathe their brows’. See Pliny, Natural History, 16.62.147: poets use the species with yellow berries for garlands.


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Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[S6v f129v]

EMBLEMA CCXV [=210] .

Salix.

The willow

Quod frugiperdam salicem vocit‚rit Homerus,[1]
Clitoriis homines moribus assimulat.[2]

When Homer called the willow ‘seed-loser’, he made it like men with Clitorian habits.

Das CCXV [=210] .

Weidenbaum.

Das Homerus hat nennen thon
Den Weidenbaum ein Frucht verthon
Damit wirt angezeigt und gfast
Ein klitter Mann, der den Wein hast.

Notes:

1.Homer, Odyssey, 10.510. See Pliny, Natural History, 16.46.110: the willow drops its seed before it is absolutely ripe, and for that reason was called by Homer ‘seed-loser’.

2.The waters of Lake Clitorius in Arcadia generated an aversion to wine in those who drank of them. See Pliny, Natural History, 31.13.16; Ovid, Metamorphoses, 15.322ff. The combination of the two images here may symbolise minds and characters gone to the bad and producing nothing of value. See Erasmus, Parabolae, p. 268: “As willow-seed, shed before it ripens, is not only itself barren but when used as a drug causes barrenness in women by preventing conception, so the words of those who teach before they have truly learnt sense not only make them no better in themselves, but corrupt their audience and render it unteachable”; and p. 230: “Those who have drunk of the Clitorian Lake develop a distaste for wine, and those who have once tasted poetry reject the counsels of philosophy, or the other way round. Equally, those who gorge themselves with fashionable pleasures reject those satisfactions which are honourable and genuine.”


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    • sobriety; 'Sobriet√†', 'Astinenza' (Ripa) [31B59] Search | Browse Iconclass
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