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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Cc5v f281v]

Ilex.

The holm-oak

Emblema ccv.

Duritie nimia[1] quňd sese rumperet ilex,
Symbola civilis seditionis habet.

Because the holm-oak splits spontaneously through excessive inflexibility, it provides symbols for civic discord.

ILex eos refert qui sunt tumultuosi, spectata nimi-
rum arboris natura, cuius lignum cům frangi nisi
admodum difficulter possit, se tamen aliquando dif-
findit & fatiscit: Ita seditio si non nisi ŕ seipsis ferč
avelluntur & franguntur.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Cc6r f282r]

Le Suse.

LE Suse dur & astraint
De soy se rompt & contraint
Jusqu’ŕ se fendre soy-mesme:
Le trouble civil de fait
De soy-mesme se deffait
Par desordre & fin extreme.

LE Suse ou Roure est la marque des tu-
multueux, en consideration que cest ar-
bre a le bois si fort que bien difficille-
ment il se peut rompre, mais il se rompt &
esclatte luy-mesme par fois: ainsi les sedi-
tieux ne sont aucunefois travaillez & rom-
pus sinon par eux-mesmes.

Notes:

1.  Duritie nimia, ‘excessive inflexibility’. Cf. Pliny, Natural History, 16.73.186 (tota ossea est ilex, ‘the holm-oak is entirely bone-like’).


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [S6v f129v]

EMBLEMA CCXV [=210] .

Salix.

The willow

Quod frugiperdam salicem vocitârit Homerus,[1]
Clitoriis homines moribus assimulat.[2]

When Homer called the willow ‘seed-loser’, he made it like men with Clitorian habits.

Das CCXV [=210] .

Weidenbaum.

Das Homerus hat nennen thon
Den Weidenbaum ein Frucht verthon
Damit wirt angezeigt und gfast
Ein klitter Mann, der den Wein hast.

Notes:

1.  Homer, Odyssey, 10.510. See Pliny, Natural History, 16.46.110: the willow drops its seed before it is absolutely ripe, and for that reason was called by Homer ‘seed-loser’.

2.  The waters of Lake Clitorius in Arcadia generated an aversion to wine in those who drank of them. See Pliny, Natural History, 31.13.16; Ovid, Metamorphoses, 15.322ff. The combination of the two images here may symbolise minds and characters gone to the bad and producing nothing of value. See Erasmus, Parabolae, p. 268: “As willow-seed, shed before it ripens, is not only itself barren but when used as a drug causes barrenness in women by preventing conception, so the words of those who teach before they have truly learnt sense not only make them no better in themselves, but corrupt their audience and render it unteachable”; and p. 230: “Those who have drunk of the Clitorian Lake develop a distaste for wine, and those who have once tasted poetry reject the counsels of philosophy, or the other way round. Equally, those who gorge themselves with fashionable pleasures reject those satisfactions which are honourable and genuine.”


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    • trees: willow (+ plants used symbolically) [25G3(WILLOW)(+1)] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • sobriety; 'SobrietĂ ', 'Astinenza' (Ripa) [31B59] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • Non-procreation (+ emblematical representation of concept) [58AA2(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • geographical names of countries, regions, mountains, rivers, etc. (names of cities and villages excepted) (with NAME [61D(CLITOR)] Search | Browse Iconclass
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