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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [B4v p24]

Quā Dii vocant, eundum.

Go where Heaven calls.

EMBLEMA VIII.

In trivio mons est lapidum: supereminet illi
Trunca Dei effigies, pectore facta tenus.
Mercurii est igitur tumulus.[1] suspende viator
Serta Deo, rectum qui tibi monstrat iter.
Omnes in trivio sumus, atque hoc tramite vitae
Fallimur, ostendat ni Deus ipse viam.

At a parting of the ways, there is a hillock of stones. Rising above it is a half-statue of a god, fashioned as far down as the chest. So the hill is Mercury’s. Traveller, hang wreaths in honour of the god who points out the road to you. We are all at the crossroads, and on this track of life we go wrong, unless God himself shows us the way.

Notes:

1.  Mercury was, among his many other functions, the god of travellers.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [B5r p25]

Fidei Symbolum.

The symbol of good faith.

EMBLEMA IX.

Stet depictus Honos tyrio velatus amictu,
Eiusque iungat nuda dextram Veritas.
Sitque Amor in medio castus,[1] cui tempora circum
Rosa it, Diones pulchrior Cupidine.[2]
Constituunt haec signa Fidem, reverentia Honoris
Quam fovet, alit Amor, parturitque Veritas.

Let Honour stand depicted, clothed in a garment of Tyrian purple, and let naked Truth hold his right hand. Between them, let chaste Love be represented, his brow garlanded with roses, but fairer than Cupid, Dione’s boy. These images constitute good faith, which the reverence due to Honour fosters, Love feeds, Truth brings to birth.

Notes:

1.  Amor...castus, ‘chaste love’ (Anteros), for which see [A91a110] and [A91a109].

2.  ‘Dione’s boy’. Strictly Dione was the mother of Venus, but was often identified in poetry with Venus herself, the mother of Cupid.


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