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Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [N2v p196]

In eum qui sibi ipsi[1] damnum
apparat.

One who brings about his own downfall

Capra, lupum non sponte meo nunc ubere lacto,
Qud mal pastoris provida cura iubet.[2]
Creverit ille simul, mea me pst ubera pascet.
Improbitas nullo flectitur obsequio.[3]

I am a goat giving suck against my will - to a wolf. The improvident kindness of the shepherd makes me do this. Once the wolf has grown, after feeding at my teats, he will then eat me. Wickedness is never deterred by services rendered.

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [N3r p197]

A ceulx qui saprestent dommaige.

Voyez moy paovre & simple chievre,
Qui laisse ung loup mon pis teter.
Jen suis dolente, & pis que en fievre.
Car mal men sentiray traicter.
Mon maistre deust bien regretter
Cest acte, sil fust homme expert:
Veu quon a sceu pieca noter,[4]
Que en tous meschans, plaisir se perd.

Notes:

1. Textual variant: ‘ipsi’ omitted.

2. This is a translation of Anthologia graeca 9.47. For the content cf. Aesop, Fables 313-5.

3. ‘Wickedness is never deterred by services rendered’. See Erasmus, Adagia 1086, Ale luporum catulos.

4. This line is revised, cf. 1536 edition.


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Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [K6v p156]

Semper praesto esse infortunia.

Misfortune is always at hand

EMBLEMA CXXIX.

Ludebant parili tres olim aetate puellae
Sortibus, ad Stygias quae prior iret aquas.
At cui iactato mal cesserat alea talo,
Ridebat sortis caeca puella suae:
Cm subito icta caput labente est mortua tecto,
Solvit & audacis debita fata ioci.
Rebus in adversis mala sors non fallitur: ast in
Faustis, nec precibus, nec locus est manui.[1]

Once three girls of the same age were amusing themselves, casting lots to see which of them would be the first to go to the waters of the Styx. When the dice were cast, the throw fell out unluckily for one of them, but she laughed with blind contempt at the fate predicted for her. Then suddenly she died, struck on the head as the roof fell in, and so paid the fated penalty for her bold mockery. In misfortune, a bad omen cannot be eluded, but even in prosperity neither prayers nor action have any place.

Notes:

1. This is a translation of Anthologia graeca 9.158.


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  • (private) prayer; 'Oratione', 'Preghiere', 'Preghiere a Dio' (Ripa) [11Q2] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Weakness, Powerlessness, Helplessness; 'Infermit' (Ripa) [54AA7] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Luck, Fortune, Lot; 'Fato', 'Fortuna', 'Fortuna aurea', 'Fortuna buona', 'Fortuna pacifica overo clemente', 'Sorte' (Ripa) [54F12] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Turn of Fate, Wheel of Fortune (+ emblematical representation of concept) [54F121(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Adversity, Misfortune, Bad Luck; 'Fortuna infelice', 'Infortunio' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [54FF11(+4):51A4(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Mortality, Extinction of Life [58BB1] Search | Browse Iconclass

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