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Section: LES ARBRES. View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [R2v p260]

Le saulx.[1]

Le Saulx fruyct-perd, nommé Homere divin,[2]
Notant ceulx la qui point ne beuvent vin.

Homere souverain Poete, ha par propre epithete
appellé le Saulx fruict perd, pource qu’il ne porte point
de fruyct, & croist en l’eau, ou pres de l’eau. Par cela
signifiant, que les beuveurs d’eau sont infructueux de
corps, ou d’esprit: mesme que la semence du Saulx
faict perdre chaleur naturelle, & puissance d’engendrer.

Notes:

1.  The woodcut here is a fairly close, laterally inverted, copy of that used in the 1549 French edition.

2.  Homer, Odyssey, 10.510. See Pliny, Natural History, 16.46.110: the willow drops its seed before it is absolutely ripe, and for that reason was called by Homer ‘seed-loser’.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [p189]

SALICE.

Willow.


L’Infruttuoso Salice s’aguaglia
A l’huom, che molto ardisca, e nulla vaglia.


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