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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [B6v p28]

Silentium.

Silence

EMBLEMA XI.

Cum tacet, haud quicquam differt sapientibus amens:
Stultitiae est index linguaque voxque suae.
Ergo premat labias, digitoque silentia signet:
Et sese Pharium vertat in Harpocratem[1].

When he is silent, the fool differs no whit from the wise. It is tongue and voice that betray his stupidity. Let him therefore put his finger to his lips and so mark silence, and turn himself into Egyptian Harpocrates.

Notes:

1.  Harpocrates, also known as Horus, was the son of the Egyptian divinity Isis. He avenged the murder of his father Osiris by Set/Typhon. He is often represented as an infant with his finger held to his mouth as a sign of silence and economy of words. See Plutarch, De Iside et Osiride 68.


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  • Wisdom; 'Sapienza', 'Sapienza humana', 'Sapienza vera' (Ripa) [52A51] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Ignorance; 'Ignoranza', 'Ignoranza di tutte le cose', 'Ignoranza in un ricco senza lettere' (Ripa) [52AA5] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Folly, Foolishness; 'Pazzia', 'Sciocchezza', 'Stoltitia' (Ripa) [52AA51] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Taciturnity; 'Secretezza', 'Secretezza overo Taciturnità' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [52DD3(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass

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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [B4v]

Potentissimus affectus Amor.

Love, the all-powerful emotion

Aspice ut invictus vires auriga leonis
Expressus gemma pusio vincat Amor.
Utque manu hac scuticam teneat, hac flectat[1] habenas,
Utque sit in pueri plurimus ore decor.
Dira lues procul esto, feram qui vincere talem,
Est potis, à nobis temperet an ne manus? [2]

Look - here’s Love the lad, carved on a gem. He rides triumphant in his chariot and subdues the lion’s might. In one hand he holds a lash, with the other he guides the reins, and on his countenance rests the loveliness of youth. - Dread pestilence keep far away. Would one who has the power to conquer such a beast keep his hands from us?

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [B5r]

Amour affection trespuissante.

Pensez a ce petit chartier
Qui scait mettre au joug les lyons,
Nous pourra il point chastier:
Et ouvret sur ce que voulions,
Noz cueurs? dont fault que allieurs plions:
Car sil est puissant pour telz bestes,
Pensez vous que nous en allions,
Sans quil nous lie cueurs & testes?

Notes:

1.  Textual variant: flectit in 1550

2.  This is a translation of Anthologia graeca 9.221, an epigram about a seal carved with a representation of Eros driving a chariot drawn by lions.


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  • plague [31A4621] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • ornaments, jewels [41D266] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Strength, Power; 'Fortezza', 'Fortezza d'Animo e di corpo', 'Fortezza del corpo congiunta con la generositàdell'animo', 'Fortezza & valore del corpo congiunto con la prudenza & virtù del animo', 'Forza' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of con [54A7(+4):56F2(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • 'Forza d'amore, Forza d'amore si nell'acqua come in terra' (Ripa) [56F2515] Search | Browse Iconclass

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