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Sur celluy qui procure mal soymesme.

PROSOPOPOEIE.

A grand regret je Chievre ung loup allaicte
Mais mon pasteur le nourrir se delecte,[1]
Quand creu sera, il fauldra qu’il me mange:
Par nul bienfaict mauvaistie ne se change.[2]

Plusieurs nourrissent ceulx, par les-
quelz ilz seront destruictz.

Notes:

1. This is a translation of Anthologia graeca 9.47. For the content cf. Aesop, Fables 313-5.

2. ‘Wickedness is never deterred by services rendered’. See Erasmus, Adagia 1086, Ale luporum catulos.


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Fere simile ex Theocrito.[1]

Something more or less the same from Theocritus

Alveolis dum mella legit, percussit Amorem
Furacem mala apes, & summis spicula liquit
In digitis, tumido gemit at puer anxius ungue,
Et quatit errabundus humum, Venerique dolorem
Indicat, & graviter queritur qud apicula parvum
Ipsa inferre animal tam noxia vulnera possit.[2]

While he was taking honey from the hives, a vicious bee stung thieving Amor, and left its sting in the end of his finger. The boy in distress cried out as his finger-end swelled up. He ran about, stamping his foot, showed his hurt to Venus, and complained bitterly that a little bee, that tiny creature, could inflict such grievous wounds.

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autrement.

Cupido peu loing de sa mere,
Mouche a miel pour oyseaux prenant,
Sentit tost leur morsure amere:
Si crie, & fuyt incontinent.
Sa mere en ris dit: maintenant
Savez vous que cest de poincture.
Petit corps est grand mal donnant.
Cest en suyvant vostre nature.

Notes:

1. 3rd-century BC bucolic poet, who may or may not have wrriten the Idylls (19, The Honey Stealer), of which this is a fairly close translation, in dactylic hexameters, as in the Greek original.

2. Two extra lines are added in 1550 - Cui ridens Venus, Hanc imitaris tu quoque dixit Nate feram, qui das tot noxia vulnera parvus. (Venus smiled at him and said, “You are like this creature, my son; small as you are you deal many a grievous wound”.)


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