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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [m8v p192]

In fraudulentos.

Deceivers

IX.

Parva lacerta, atris stellatus corpora guttis
Stellio,[1] qui latebras, & cava busta colit,
Invidiae parvique doli fert symbola pictus,
Heu nimium nuribus cognita zelotypis.
Nam turpi obtegitur faciem lentigine quisquis.
Sit quibus immersus Stellio, vina bibat.[2]
Hinc vindicta frequens decepta pellice vino.
Quam formae amisso flore relinquit amans.

The little lizard, called the ‘starred’ gecko from the dark star-shaped marks sprinkled all over its body, a creature that lurks in holes and hollow tombs, is pictured here and presents symbols of resentment and wicked deception, known only too well to jealous wives. For anyone who drinks wine in which a spotted gecko has been soaked comes out in ugly spots all over the face. This is often a way of taking revenge - the husband’s fancy woman is tricked with wine, and, when the flower of her beauty is gone, her lover abandons her.

Notes:

1.  stellio, ‘the ‘starred’ gecko’. See Ovid, Metamorphoses, 5.461 for the explanation of the name stellio.

2.  Nam turpi...vina bibat, ‘anyone who drinks wine...all over the face’. See Pliny, Natural History, 29.22.73.


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    Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [F7v p94]

    LUXURE.

    Luxure.

    Pan piedebouc, couronné de Rocquette,
    De grand luxure est symbole, ou marquette.
    Rocquette est chaulde, & bouc luxurieux,[1]
    Et les Satyrs des Nymphes amoureux.[2]

    Ceste enseigne de luxure est prinse sur la nature de
    l’herbe Rocquette esmouvant ŕ paillardise, & de la
    beste Boucquine tresluxurieuse, donnant ŕ enten-
    dre, que luxure eschaulfe ardemment: & puys put
    villainement.

    Notes:

    1.  Rocket is described as herba salax at Ovid, Ars amatoria, 4.22. Pliny, Natural History, 10.83.182 and 19.44.154, lists it as an aphrodisiac.

    2.  Satyrs were creatures half-human, half-goat in form, like Faunus, and Pan with whom Faunus was often identified. See emblems 91 ([FALb091]), and 115 ([FALb115]). Cf. Horace, Odes, 3.18.1: ‘Faunus, you who lust after the fleeing nymphs’.


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    • Lust, Luxury, 'Luxuria'; 'Lussuria' (Ripa) ~ personification of one of the Deadly Sins [11N36] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • Licentiousness, Lasciviousness; 'Lascivia', 'Licenza' (Ripa) (+ personification) [57AA51(+1)] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • Licentiousness, Lasciviousness; 'Lascivia', 'Licenza' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [57AA51(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • nymphs (in general); 'Ninfe in commune' (Ripa) [92L3] Search | Browse Iconclass

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