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Section: ARBORES (Trees). View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [O7r p221]

Malus medica.

The citron

Aurea sunt Veneris poma haec: iucundus amaror
Indicat, est Graecis sic γλυκυπίκρος amor.[1]

These golden fruits belong to Venus: the sweet bitterness tells us that. Even so is love glukupikros for the Greeks.

Notes:

1.  γλυκύπικρος, ‘bitter-sweet’, a concept often applied to Love in Hellenistic epigrams. See Emblem 111 ([A51a111]).


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  • Europeans (with NAME) [32B311(GREEKS)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Pleasure, Enjoyment, Joy; 'Allegrezza', 'Allegrezza da le medaglie', 'Allegrezza, letitia e giubilo', 'Diletto', 'Piacere', 'Piacere honesto' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [56B1(+4):56F2(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Bitterness; 'Amaritudine' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [56BB11(+4):56F2(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • attributes of Venus (with NAME) [92C48(ORANGE)] Search | Browse Iconclass

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Section: LES ARBRES. View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Q8v p256]

Le Morier.

Le Morier sage, & en Graec mal nommé[1]
Ne fleurit point que L’hyver consommé.[2]

Consommé, & finy Lh’yver [=L’hyver] , lors le
Morier, apres les aultres grandz arbres,
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [R1r p257]commence à jecter ses fleurs, & germes,
hors les dangiers des froidures, & ge-
lées, Ainsi faict le sage, qui ne s’advance
point en tous affaires, avant qu’il soit
temps, & ne hazarde rien, à dangier,
mais au plus seur. Parquoy, il est nom-
mé en Graec Moros par sens contraire,
Car Μώρος en Graec est à dire fol: & il
est sage, qui ne gecte point sa fleur, &
son fruyct, que tout le peril d’hyver ne
soit consommé.

Notes:

1.  Reference to a supposed ‘etymology by opposites’: Latin morus ‘mulberry’ was equated with Greek μῶρος ‘fool’, but the tree was considered wise: see note 2.

2.  See Pliny, Natural History, 16.25.102: ‘the mulberry is the last of domesticated trees to shoot, and only does so when the frosts are over; for that reason it is called the wisest of trees’.


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