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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [N5v p202]

In receptatores sicariorum.[1]

Those who harbour cut-throats

XCIIII.

Latronum furumque manus tibi Scaeva[2] per urbem
It comes, & diris cincta cohors gladiis.
Atque ita te mentis generosum prodige censes,
Quòd tua complureis allicit olla malos.
En novus Actaeon, qui postquàm cornua sumpsit,
In praedam canibus se dedit ipse suis.[3]

An evil-minded band of ruffians and thieves accompanies you about the city, a gang of supporters armed with lethal swords. And so, you wastrel, you consider yourself a fine lordly fellow because your cooking pot draws in crowds of scoundrels. - Here’s a fresh Actaeon - he, after he grew his horns, became the prey of his own hunting dogs.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [N6r p203]

Receptateurs d’homicides.

XCIIII.

Gens apres toy avecq’ espees,
(Dont plusieurs ont gaigné le pendre,
Ou d’avoir oreilles coppees)
Te font cornes au chef extendre,
Mais il t’en pourra ainsi prendre,
En nourrissant telz ruffiens,
Que a Acteon: qui (faict cerf tendre)
Fust devoré de tous ses chiens.

Notes:

1.  Before the 1536 edition, Wechel editions used an earlier version of the woodcut in which the horns were more like a goat than a deer’s antlers.

2.  Scaeva, ‘evil-minded’. The capital letter suggests that the Latin word could be taken as a proper name in the vocative case, i.e addressing one Scaeva.

3.  For the story of Actaeon turned into a stag and killed by his own hounds, see Ovid, Metamorphoses 3.138ff. Similarly, the hangers-on will destroy the one who has fed them.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [I4r f76r]

Maledicentia.

Evil speaking

Emblema. li.

Archilochi[1] tumulo insculptas de marmore vespas
Esse ferunt,[2] linguae certa sigilla malae.

They say that on the tomb of Archilochus wasps were carved in marble, sure figures of an evil tongue.

SImile quid legitur in 3. Graecorum epigramma-
ton. Vespae autem tumulo Archilochi affixae, ef-
frenis linguae petulantiam arguunt. Quod torqueri
facilè potest in scriptorem quendam maledicum,
quíque alios fuerit insana quadam obtrectandi li-
centia infectatus. Vespae sunt raucae & mordaces:
acriter enim pungunt, sed neque mel, neque ceram
fingunt: ita maledicis unum carpendi, convician-
díque studium, in caeteris inutiles & inepti.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [I4v f76v]

Mesdisance.

SUr le tombeau d’Archilochus assises
Les Guespes sont, qui servent de devises,
Pour demonstrer son eguillon cuisant,
Et qu’il fut trop poignant & mesdisant.

LE semblable se trouve au 3. des epigram-
mes Grecs, Les Guespes mises sur le
tombeau d’Archilochus, denotent une lan-
gue mauvaise & pleine de malledicence.
Ce que se peust aussi accommoder à l’encon-
tre d’un escrivain mesdisant, & qui n’a faict
autre estat que detracter des autres avec
licence du tout desbordee. Les Gues-
pes sont rauques & poignantes: car elles pic-
quent fort serré: cependant elles ne font ny
miel ny cire: tels sont les mesdisans, qui se
contentent seulement de mordre & poindre.
Mais en toutes autres choses ils sont inuti-
les & ineptes.

Notes:

1.  Archilochus was an eighth-century BC poet, author of much (now fragmentary) verse, including satire. This last was considered in antiquity to be excessively abusive and violent. See Horace, Ars Poetica, 79; also Erasmus, Adagia, 60 (Irritare crabrones).

2.  ferunt, ‘they say’: words suggested by Anthologia Graeca, 7.71, an epigram concerning the tomb of Archilochus.


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