Single Emblem View

Section: ARBORES (Trees). View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [O3r p213]

Cupressus.

The Cypress

Indicat effigies metae, nomenque Cupressi
Tractandos parili conditione suos.[1]
aliud.
Funesta est arbor, procerum monumenta Cupressus,
Quale Apium plebis, comere fronde solet.[2]
aliud.
Pulchra coma est, pulchro digestaeque ordine frondes,
Sed fructus nullos haec coma pulchra gerit.[3]

The cone-shaped form and the name ‘cypress’ indicate that one’s people should be dealt with on equal terms.
Other.
The cypress is a funereal tree. Its branches usually adorn the memorials of leading men as parsley-stems adorn those of humble people.
Other.
The foliage is beautiful, and the leaves all arranged in neat order, but this beautiful foliage bears no fruit.

Notes:

1. This refers to the supposed etymology, Greek κύειν and πάρισος ‘bear’,‘equal’.

2. See Pliny, Natural History, 20.44.113 for the use of parsley at funeral meals.

3. See Erasmus, Adagia, 4210 (Cyparissi fructus).


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [Bb10v f274v]

Quercus.

The Oak

Emblema cxcix.

Grata Iovi est quercus, qui nos servtque fovtque:
Servanti civem querna corona datur.[1]
Aliud.
Glande aluit veteres,[2] sola nunc proficit umbra:
Sic quoque sic arbos officiosa Iovis.

The oak is pleasing to Jove who preserves and cherishes us. A crown of oak is given to one who preserves a fellow-citizen.
Other: The oak fed men of old with its acorns. Now it benefits us only with its shade. In this way too the tree of Jove does us service.

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [Bb11r f275r]

QUercus, Iovi sacra, pro salutis usurpata symbo-
lo. Plures rationes pete Plutarcho. Querna,
seu civica corona ei dabatur olim civi, qui civem ser-
vasset: tanquam vitae testis, & salutis acceptae moni-
mentum. Sed & torqueri quercus potest vel ad ho-
minem, vel ad rem quae olim magno in honore fue-
rit, sed nunc nihil aliud sit qum magni nominis um-
bra, ut de Pompeio caeso Lucanus cecinit.

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [Bb11v f275v]

Le Chesne.

LE grand Chesne est en la garde
De Jupiter qui nous garde,
Nous maintient & tous nos biens:
Et de Chesne la coronne
Aussi celuy se donne,
Qui sauve & garde les siens.
Autre.
Le Chesne a nourry gens sans nombre,
Maintenant ne nous sert que d’ombre:
Les vieux s’en sont aidez ainsi,
Et nous nous en servons aussi.

LE Chesne, consacr Jupiter, sert de de-
vise, qui signifie salut. Plutarque en rend
plusieurs raisons. Or la coronne de Ches
ne, autrement appellee Civique, estoit an-
ciennement donnee celuy citoyen, qui a-
voit garanti de mort un autre citoyen, comme
pour memoire & tesmoinage de vie & salut.
il se peust aussi accommoder ou un homme,
ou quelque autre chose, qui jadis a est en
grande reputation, mais maintenant ne por-
te que l’ombre d’un grand nom, comme Lu-
cain
parle de Pompee mort.

Notes:

1. ‘a crown of oak’, awarded for saving the life of a fellow-soldier; see Pliny, Natural History, 16.3.7.

2. For the ancient belief that early man fed on acorns see e.g. Lucretius, De Rerum natura, 5.939; Vergil, Georgics, 1.7; Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.106.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

 

Back to top

Privacy notice
Terms and conditions