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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [n1v p194]

Strenuorum immortale
nomen.

Achievers have an immortal name

XVII.

Aeacidae tumulum Rhoetaeo in littore cernis,[1]
Quem plerunque pedes visitat alba Thetis.[2]
Obtegitur semper viridi lapis hic amarantho,[3]
Quòd nunquam herois sit moriturus honos.
Hic Graium murus,[4] magni nex Hectoris, aut [=haud] plus
Debet Maeonidae, quam sibi Maeonides.[5]

You see the tomb of Aeacus’ descendant on the Rhoetean shore, which white-footed Thetis often visits. This stone is always covered with green amaranth, because the honour due to heroes shall never die. This man was‘the wall of the Greeks’, and the destruction of great Hector, and he owes no more to the Lydian poet than the poet does to him.

Notes:

1.  ‘Aeacus’ descendant’, i.e. Achilles, the greatest warrior on the Greek side in the Trojan War. Rhoeteum was a promontory on the Trojan coast (though normally associated with the tomb of Ajax).

2.  Thetis, a sea-nymph, mother of Achilles, called ‘silver-footed’ by Homer.

3.  amarantho: the name of the plant means ‘never-fading’. See Pliny, Natural History, 21.23.47.

4.  ‘the wall of the Greeks’, translating Homer’s description of Achilles at Iliad, 3.229.

5.  Maeonidae, ‘to the Lydian poet’, i.e. Homer, who told in the Iliad the famous story of Achilles’ wrath and refusal to fight during the Trojan War, and of his eventual slaying of Hector, the chief warrior on the Trojan side. (For which see Emblem 057, [A56a057]). For the sentiment that great deeds need to be sung in order not to be forgotten, see Horace, Odes, 4.8.20ff; and that great literature needs great themes, see Tacitus, Dialogus de oratoribus, 37.


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    Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [M2v p180]

    Il faut fuïr les courtisanes.

    XVI.

    Circé, fille au Soleil, par ses arts tant pouvoit
    Qu’en ours, boucs & lions les hommes transformoit,
    Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [M3r p181] Tesmoin l’escuyer Pic,[1] et Scylle la biforme,[2]
    Et les gents d’Ulysses, qu’en porceaux ell’ transforme.[3]
    Cil qui du fol amour boit le sorcier bruvage,
    Soudain en perd le sens, devient fol & mal sage.

    Commentaires.

    La fable de Circé se void en plusieurs auteurs,
    Grecs & Latins. Ovide la descrit aussi en sa metamor-
    phose, & celle de Pic & de Scylla. Mais Palladas,
    aux epigrammes Grecs, destourne ailleurs celle de
    Circé: car il dit, que Circé avec sa verge ne transfor-
    moit point les homme en pourceaux & autres ani-
    maux: mais qu’elle reduisoit en telle povreté ses a-
    moureux, qu’ils estoyent contraints, s’ils vouloyent
    substanter leur miserable vie, de devenir en fin lar-
    rons, brigands, guetteurs de chemins, & meurtriers.

    Notes:

    1.  Picus, an Italian king, a breeder of horses, turned into a woodpecker by Circe. See Ovid, Metamorphoses, 14.320ff.

    2.  Scylla was transformed into a figure that was half girl, half barking dogs. See Ovid, Metamorphoses, 14.51ff. Cf. Emblem 94 ([FALd294]).

    3.  See Homer, Odyssey, 10.229ff. for the story of Ulysses’ sailors who were turned into pigs by Circe with a magic potion of wine.


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    • love potion, philtre [13D41] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • beasts of prey, predatory animals (with NAME) [25F23(BEAR)] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • beasts of prey, predatory animals (with NAME) [25F23(LION)] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • hoofed animals (with NAME) [25F24(STAG)] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • whore, prostitute [33C520] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • courtesan, hetaera [33C521] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • Reason versus Amorous Lust; 'Combattimento della ragione con l'appetito' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [52B513(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • Danger; 'Pericolo' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [54DD51(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • Ulysses' companions are changed into all kinds of animals (+ variant) [97C81(+0)] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • Picus changed into a woodpecker: Circe changes Picus into a woodpecker because, faithful to his wife Canens, he spurns the love of the goddess (Ovid, Metamorphoses XIV 386) (+ variant) [97D28(+0)] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • Scylla changed into a sea-monster: Circe, to whom Glaucus has applied for aid in his love suit, changes Scylla the sea-nymph into a sea-monster (Ovid, Metamorphoses XIV 59) (+ variant) [97EE3(+0)] Search | Browse Iconclass

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