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Concordia insuperabilis.

Concord is insuperable

XVIII.

Tergeminos inter fuerat concordia fratres,
Tanta simul pietas mutua, & unus amor:
Invicti humanis ut viribus ampla tenerent
Regna, uno dicti nomine Geryonis.[1]

There was concord between triplet brothers, such mutual care, one love between them all; and so, unconquerable by human force, they held wide realms and were called by the one name of Geryones.

Notes:

1. This is a rationalisation of Geryones, the unconquerable giant with three heads or three bodies, who dwelt on the island Erytheia of the mythic Hesperides, eventually vanquished and killed by Hercules during his abduction of Geryones’ famous cattle. See Emblem 225 ([A56a225]).


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    Les nobles & genereux.

    XX.

    La boucle d’or joignoit la robbe Athenienne,
    Et la gente cigale avec soy accrochoit.
    Le Romain une lune en sa pantoufle avoit.[1]
    Se disant estre extraict d’Arcadie ancienne.[2]
    Et tout cecy n’estoit que pour remarque expresse
    Que ces deux gents estoyent d’une antique noblesse

    Commentaires.

    Un coeur genereux, c’est la vraye noblesse. La no-
    blesse des animaux gist en la force & soupplesse de
    leur corps: mais celle de l’homme gist en la candeur
    de ses moeurs. Et par ainsi les seuls vertueux sont
    Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [M5v p185] nobles. Au lieu o la cigale naist, l aussi elle vit &
    meurt. C’est pourquoy les Atheniens l’entortilloyent
    en leurs cheveux, & la joignoyent leur boucles:
    car ils se disoyent estre nais du territoire Attique,
    sans que leurs devanciers fussent venus d’aucune au-
    tre region: aussi faisoyent-ils plus de cas d’Athenes,
    que d’aucune autre place de la terre. Les Romains
    souloyent aussi porter des petites lunes en leurs sou-
    liers, pour marque de leur noblesse.

    Notes:

    1. Members of the inner circle of noble Roman families claiming descent from the first senators (patres), one hundred in number, appointed by Romulus, founder and first ruler of Rome. These patrician families wore a distinctive black boot with a crescent-shaped ornament. Those members who achieved high political office wore similar red boots, calcei mullei, so called because their colour was like that of a mullet (according to Isidore, Etymologiae (Origines), 19.34.4 and 10).

    2. The Arcadians wore crescent-shaped ornaments because they believed themselves to be the first men on earth and older than the moon. See Ovid, Fastii, 2.290. Evander, who came from Arcadia, was the founder of the primitive settlement on the Palatine hill which preceded Romulus’ Rome. See Vergil, Aeneid, 8.; Plutarch, Quaestiones Romanae, 76.


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