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Link to an image of this pageá Link to an image of this page á[Hhh5r p857]

Abies.

The fir tree

EMBLEMA CCII.

Apta fretis Abies in montibus editur altis:
Est & in adversis maxima commoditas.[1]

The fir tree that is fit to sail the sea grows high up on the hills. Even in hard circumstances, there is great advantage to be found.

Notes:

1. áThis is because it grows strong by withstanding the gales and harsh weather. Contrast Anthologia Graeca, 9.30ff, 105, and the much-translated 376 for an opposing view of the fir tree: “how can the fir, storm-tossed while growing on land, resist the gales at sea?” 9.31 was translated by Alciato (Selecta epigrammata, p. 98).


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Link to an image of this pageá Link to an image of this page á[N3v p198]

Le pin.

XXXV.

Ce que nuls rejectons du tronc du pin ne naissent:
Marque ceux qui mourans nuls enfans ne delaissent.

Commentaires.

Celuy n’est pas digne de naistre au monde, qui
n’y en fait point naistre d’autre. Le pin est le symbole
de ceux qui ne se marient point, ou qui sont steriles.
Car le pin ne fait point de rejectons.


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