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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [o1r p209]

Maledicentia.[1]

Evil speaking

LXVII.

Archilochi[2] tumulo insculptas de marmore vespas
Esse ferunt,[3] linguae certa sigilla malae.

They say that on the tomb of Archilochus wasps were carved in marble, sure figures of an evil tongue.

Notes:

1.  It is to be noted that in this edition, as in the 1546, Maledicentia and Contra are treated as one emblem whereas in other editions Contra is treated as an emblem in its own right called Principis Clementia.

2.  Archilochus was an eighth-century BC poet, author of much (now fragmentary) verse, including satire. This last was considered in antiquity to be excessively abusive and violent. See Horace, Ars Poetica, 79; also Erasmus, Adagia, 60 (Irritare crabrones).

3.  ferunt, ‘they say’: words suggested by Anthologia Graeca, 7.71, an epigram concerning the tomb of Archilochus.


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    Single Emblem View

    Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [O8r p223]

    Envie.

    LXIIII.

    Une orde femme vois, qui de serpents se gorge,
    A qui les yeux font mal,[1] qui son coeur ronge en gorge,
    Maigre, pasle au possible, & qui porte un baston
    Espineux, sçaches que l’Envie ainsi peinct on.[2]

    Commentaires.

    Alciat peind icy Envie de toutes ses vives couleurs,
    disant, qu’elle a les yeux malins, quelle se repaist de
    poison, & de despit qu’elle a que les autres prosperent,
    elle mange son propre coeur. Elle s’esjouit du mal
    d’autruy, & s’en nourrit. Les animaux venimeux,
    s’ils se nourrissent de poison, ils en deviennent beau-
    coup plus venimeux. mais les meschantes oeuvres de
    l’envieux, luy retournent en fin sur sa propre teste.

    Notes:

    1.  A qui les yeux font mal is a proverbial expression, referring to the pain of seeing what one does not like.

    2.  This description is taken from Ovid, Metamorphoses, 2.760ff., a depiction of the House of Envy.


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