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Avaritia.

Avarice

LXV.

Heu miser in mediis sitiens stat Tantalus undis,
Et poma esuriens proxima habere nequit.
Nomine mutato de te id dicetur avare,
Qui, quasi non habeas, non frueris quod habes.[1]

Alas, poor Tantalus stands thirsting in the midst of waters, nor can he, for all his hunger, get the fruit close by. Miser, change the name and this will apply to you, since you get no more enjoyment out of what you have than if you didn’t have it.

Notes:

1. quasi non habeas, non frueris quod habes: ‘you get no more enjoyment out of what you have than if you didn’t have it’. Cf. Tam deest avaro quod habet quam quod non habet, ‘the miser is deprived of what he has as much as what he has not’, a well-known proverb of Publilius Syrus, quoted e.g. in Quintilian, Institutio oratoria, 8.5.5. See Erasmus, Adagia, 1514 (Tantali poenae).



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    La gourmandise.

    LXVI.

    Qui veut representer un goulu ou goulue,
    Grosse panse il luy baille, & un grand col de grue,[1]
    Et luy met sur ses poings la foulque & le butor.
    Tel estoit un Denis,[2] & un Apice encor,[3]
    Qui par leur gloutonnie & molle friandise
    Font qu’encor aujourd’huy pour goulus on les prise.

    Commentaires.

    La foulque & le butor sont oiseaux extremement
    goulus, & qui ne se peuvent jamais soulersouler: & pource
    sont-ils employs par les potes, quand ils veulent re-
    Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [P1r p225] marquer un vray goulu. Denys & Apice sont te-
    nus pour patriarches des frians: aussi en ont-ils publi
    des preceptes, qui encor aujourd-huy se voyent tra-
    duicts en divers vulgaires: Ils ne sont pas seuls. Il n’y
    en a que trop encor par tout.

    Notes:

    1. These birds were symbols of ravenous greed. The pelican is called inexplebile animal, ‘insatiable creature’, by Pliny, Natural History, 10.66.131; cf. Emblem 83 ([FALe083]). For the gull, see Erasmus, Adagia, 1133 (Larus: the gull will also fit food-suppliers because it is a bird with an appetite for fish).

    2. Dionysius II, Tyrant of Syracuse. After his deposition, he lived in Corinth, and many anecdotes were told of his indulgent way of life there, including the story that he died of being overweight.

    3. Apicius was a famous gourmet of the time of the Emperor Tiberius. See Seneca, De consolatione, 10.8-9 and Martial, Epigrams, 3.22: he spent a hundred million sesterces on food items and committed suicide for fear of starvation on discovering that he had only one million left. He composed two cookery books, but the one which has come down to us under his name is a fourth- to fifth-century compilation drawing on his works and several others (ed. princ. Le Signerre, Milan 1498).



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      • Gluttony, Intemperance, 'Gula'; 'Gola', 'Ingordigia', 'Ingordigia overo Avidità', 'Voracità' (Ripa) ~ personification of one of the Seven Deadly Sins [11N35] Search | Browse Iconclass
      • water-birds (with NAME) [25F36(COOT)] Search | Browse Iconclass
      • water-birds: pelican [25F36(PELICAN)] Search | Browse Iconclass
      • anthropomorphic beings with parts of abnormal shape (+ abdomen, belly) [31A444(+13)] Search | Browse Iconclass
      • anthropomorphic beings with parts of abnormal shape (+ neck) [31A444(+615)] Search | Browse Iconclass
      • anthropomorphic beings with parts of abnormal shape (+ neck) [31A444(+615):25F37(CRANE)(+3)] Search | Browse Iconclass
      • Intemperance, Immoderation (+ emblematical representation of concept) [54AA43(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
      • specific aspects, allegorical aspects of Bacchus; Bacchus as patron [92L17] Search | Browse Iconclass
      • male persons from classical history (with NAME) representations to which the NAME of a person from classical history may be attached [98B(APICIUS, Marcus Gavius)3] Search | Browse Iconclass

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