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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Q7v f114v]

EMBLEMA CLXXXIII [=182] .

Malč parta malč dilabuntur.[1]

Ill gotten, ill spent

Miluus edax[2] nimiae quem nausea torserat esce,
Hei mihi mater ait, viscera ab ore fluunt.
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Q8r f115r]Illa autem: quid fles? cur haec tua viscera credas,
Qui rapto vivens sola aliena vomis?

A voracious kite, which had eaten too much, was racked with vomiting. ‘O dear, mother’, it said, ‘entrails are pouring out of my mouth.’ She however replied: ‘What are you crying about? Why do you think these are your entrails? You live by plunder and vomit only what belongs to others.’

Das CLXXXIII [=182] .

Ubel gewunnen ubel verthan.

Ein fressiger Weyh auff ein zeit
Wider gab das er vor mit geit
Eingewirckt hett, sprach: Mutter mein
All mein inners wil hrauß mit pein.
Die Mutter sprach: Was weinstu sehr?
Woltst wehn das diß dein ingweid wer?
Das du mit der Speiß heraus gülffst
Der du dich nur deß Raubs behilffst.

Notes:

1.  The title is proverbial. See Cicero, Philippics, 2.65.

2.  ‘A voracious kite’. The kite was a figure of greed and extortion.



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    Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [E1r]

    PAX.

    Peace

    Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [E1v]

    Turrigeris humeris, dentis quoque barrus eburni,
    Qui superare ferox Martia bella solet. [M]
    Supposuit nunc colla iugo stimulisque subactus,
    Caesareos currus ad pia templa vehit.
    Vel fera cognoscit concordes undique gentes,
    Proiectisque armis munia pacis obit.[1]

    The elephant, with its tower-bearing shoulders and ivory tusk, a beast accustomed to dominate the conflicts of Mars with savage ravings, has now submitted its neck to the yoke: subdued by goads, it draws Caesar’s chariot to the holy temples. Even the beast recognises nations reconciled on every side, and rejecting the weapons of war, it performs the duties of peace.

    [Marginalia - link to text]Vide Suetonium in vita Gaii [Julii] Caesaris.[2]

    Notes:

    1.  This is translated from Anthologia graeca 9.285, which refers to an occasion under the Emperor Tiberius when the statue of the Deified Augustus was for the first time borne in procession in a chariot drawn by elephants.

    2.  The episode in Suetonius’s ‘Life of Julius Caesar’ (ch. 37) is not really relevant to this text.



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