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Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[P1r p225]

Mesdisance.

LXVII.

D’Archiloque[1] au tumbeau la guespe est engravee,
Pour monstrer que sa langue estoit envenimee.

Commentaires.

Archiloque fut si picquant & mordant en sa
poŽsie, que par ses poignants jambes il contraignit
Lycambe, son beau pere, de s’aller estrangler. De lŗ
est venu qu’on a appelť Archiloques tous ceux qui
ont escrit d’un stile ainsi venimeux. Les guespes sont
engravees sur son tumbeau, non seulement pource
qu’elles sont enrouŽes & mordantes, mais aussi pour-
ce que d’elles on ne tire ny plaisir ny proffit.

Notes:

1.Archilochus was an eighth-century BC poet, author of much (now fragmentary) verse, including satire. This last was considered in antiquity to be excessively abusive and violent. See Horace, Ars Poetica, 79; also Erasmus, Adagia, 60 (Irritare crabrones).



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    • insects: wasp (+ animals used symbolically) [25F711(WASP)(+1)] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • grave, tomb [4.20E+32] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • Calumny, Detraction; 'Biasimo vitioso', 'Calunnia', 'Detrattione', 'Maledicenza' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [57BB25(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • male persons from classical history (with NAME) representations to which the NAME of a person from classical history may be attached [98B(ARCHILOCHUS)3] Search | Browse Iconclass

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    Single Emblem View

    Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[n8v p208]

    Superbia.

    Pride

    LXII.

    En statuae statua,[1] & ductum de marmore marmor
    Se conferre deis ausa procax Niobe. [2]
    Est vitium muliebre superbia, & arguit oris
    Duritiem, ac sensus, qualis inest lapidi.

    Behold a statue of a statue, marble carved from marble, insolent Niobe, who dared to set herself up against the gods. Pride is a woman’s vice, and shows hardness of face and feeling, such as exists in a stone.

    Notes:

    1.According to the best-known story of her fate, Niobe was turned to stone. For the statue of Niobe by Praxiteles, see Ausonius, Epigrams, 63.2 and Anthologia Graeca, 16.130, a much translated epigram, which seems to have been in Alciato’s thoughts here.

    2.Niobe in her pride boasted that having 12 (or 14) children, she was superior to Lato with just two, i.e. Apollo and Diana. These gods in revenge slew all her children and in her grief Niobe hardened into a rock; see Ovid, Metamorphoses, 6.165ff. See further, Erasmus, Adagia, 2233, ‘Niobes mala’.



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